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Sir Bobby Robson: fighting cancer again.

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Sir Bobby Robson has vowed to "battle as I've always done" after revealing that the cancer he has fought on and off for 15 years has returned again.

 

The former England football manager, who is 74, started chemotherapy treatment last week.

 

But, typically, he was at St James' Park yesterday to watch Newcastle United play Blackburn Rovers.

 

Sir Bobby has undergone cancer surgery four times but now doctors have recommended a six-week bout of chemotherapy after discovering small cancerous nodules in his lungs.

 

However, Football on Sunday columnist Sir Bobby said he will carry on with his life as normal and plans to attend his annual charity golf day in Portugal.

 

He will celebrate his 52nd wedding anniversary next month with his wife Elsie - whom he has called "my rock, because she's let me do my thing" - sons Paul, Mark and Andrew and four grandchildren.

 

Sir Bobby said: "Of course, it's not the greatest news I've ever had but I have fought hard throughout my life and I will continue to fight. I will battle as I've always done.

 

"My last operation in August was a success but this time the doctors have said they can't operate.

 

"The good news is that they are measuring the nodules in my lungs in millimetres rather than centimetres!

 

"That is encouraging and we are hopeful the treatment will keep it under control.

 

"I've been advised to keep busy and active, and that's what I will be trying to do whenever possible."

 

Sir Bobby, the son of a Durham miner, was knighted in 2001 and some of his sayings have passed into folklore, most memorably when he called Paul Gascoigne "as daft as a brush".

 

He has enjoyed one of the most extraordinary careers in football, winning 20 England caps as a player - including playing in the 1958 and 1962 World Cups - and taking the team to the 1990 World Cup semi-finals during his eight years as the national manager.

 

In February, asked why he is still passionately involved with the game, he said: "My wife wants me to go to Tesco's on Saturdays, but I just couldn't. I need the drug."

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Eventually, the cancer will kill him. It's a medical certainty. Which is gutting. :D

 

 

I'm glad we are are staying positive for the old boy. :lol:

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Sadly it seems a fact. It was gutted for him reading this on sky this morning. Says that he cant have an op this time. I just hope the treatment can halt or slow its advance and that he cn carry on as normal.

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Eventually, the cancer will kill him. It's a medical certainty. Which is gutting. :D

 

 

I'm glad we are are staying positive for the old boy. :lol:

 

Sadly he has a point though. They've told him it's inoperable which, in layman's terms, means terminal.

 

Hope the old fella manages to stay comfortable as long as possible tbh.

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I've said before and i'll say it again. He's one of the only men in football who's death will move me to tears. The man is an utter legend and did a huge amount for this club on and off the pitch.

 

I remember the Keegan years with some fondness but I was fairly young so I didn't really understand what it all meant. The Robson years came when I was a teenager, when my interest was peaked. Okay, I never believed we'd actually win anything but the fact we were playing bloody good football, beating the best teams and qualifying for the Champions League was enough for me. I've got to thank Bobby for giving me some of the best games of my life. The 2-0 against the Mackems, the 4-3 against ManUre, the 3-1 against Arsenal, 4-3 against Leeds, the list goes on.

 

I know my post is going to seem fairly fatalistic and I know he's not gone yet but every time I hear this news it just makes me realise he's not long for this world.

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Inoperable doesn't mean terminal in this case

 

Inoperable means he'll be on drugs to control the cancer for the rest of his life. It means what he has cannot be cured and therefore IS terminal.

 

Was told my Mam's cancer was 'inoperable', it was only after she died that I was told it was actually 'terminal' and that they choose not to use that word.

 

Best of luck with it all Sir Bob.

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Inoperable doesn't mean terminal in this case

 

Inoperable means he'll be on drugs to control the cancer for the rest of his life. It means what he has cannot be cured and therefore IS terminal.

 

Was told my Mam's cancer was 'inoperable', it was only after she died that I was told it was actually 'terminal' and that they choose not to use that word.

 

Best of luck with it all Sir Bob.

 

Cancer is not curable completely. He has always required reassessment, which is what probably spotted this early. Cheomotherapy can do just as good a job as an operation in this case, as you can't remove his lungs, hence 'inoperable', but not terminal. You're on borrowed time from the first diagnosis, which in Bob's case was decades ago

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Inoperable doesn't mean terminal in this case

 

Inoperable means he'll be on drugs to control the cancer for the rest of his life. It means what he has cannot be cured and therefore IS terminal.

 

Was told my Mam's cancer was 'inoperable', it was only after she died that I was told it was actually 'terminal' and that they choose not to use that word.

 

Best of luck with it all Sir Bob.

 

Cancer is not curable completely. He has always required reassessment, which is what probably spotted this early. Cheomotherapy can do just as good a job as an operation in this case, as you can't remove his lungs, hence 'inoperable', but not terminal. You're on borrowed time from the first diagnosis, which in Bob's case was decades ago

 

Bollocks.

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Inoperable doesn't mean terminal in this case

 

Inoperable means he'll be on drugs to control the cancer for the rest of his life. It means what he has cannot be cured and therefore IS terminal.

 

Was told my Mam's cancer was 'inoperable', it was only after she died that I was told it was actually 'terminal' and that they choose not to use that word.

 

Best of luck with it all Sir Bob.

 

Cancer is not curable completely. He has always required reassessment, which is what probably spotted this early. Cheomotherapy can do just as good a job as an operation in this case, as you can't remove his lungs, hence 'inoperable', but not terminal. You're on borrowed time from the first diagnosis, which in Bob's case was decades ago

 

Bollocks.

 

 

You forgot to include your medical qualifications in that incredibly detailed and well thought out post.

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