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Rob W

Two Miscarriages of Justice in one day.........

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God help us from the British Police

 

The Colin Stagg case defies belief - they had a guy who had a history of raping young mums and then they go and fit up an innocent man

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God help us from the British Police

 

The Colin Stagg case defies belief - they had a guy who had a history of raping young mums and then they go and fit up an innocent man

 

Fop will have you believe they plan it that way rather than just being incompetent.

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God help us from the British Police

 

The Colin Stagg case defies belief - they had a guy who had a history of raping young mums and then they go and fit up an innocent man

 

Two terrible miscarriages of justice yes and in Stagg's case compelling evidence against the case for capital punishment.

 

However, you have to take these in the context of thousands of sound prosecutions. I still believe we have the best justice system in the world.

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God help us from the British Police

 

The Colin Stagg case defies belief - they had a guy who had a history of raping young mums and then they go and fit up an innocent man

 

Fop will have you believe they plan it that way rather than just being incompetent.

 

 

The Robert Napper issue was one of incompetence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

However the below is as good an example of the Police fitting up a completely innocent person as you will ever see:

 

 

 

 

Babysitter not guilty of murder

_45285783_36068f3f-9cf1-41b1-b8ef-f69d708fe90e.jpg

Suzanne Holdsworth always denied murdering the toddler

 

A babysitter who spent three years in prison for the murder of a neighbour's two-year-old son has been found not guilty at a retrial.

 

Suzanne Holdsworth had been accused of banging Kyle Fisher's head against a banister in Hartlepool in July 2004.

 

Ms Holdsworth, 38, now of Boggart Hill Drive, Leeds, was convicted in 2005.

 

However, doubts were raised about her conviction by journalist John Sweeney in a report for BBC Newsnight and it was quashed in May.

 

The jury at the retrial at Teesside Crown Court deliberated for two days before returning the not guilty verdict.

 

The mother-of-two was originally convicted of the murder in March 2005 and jailed for life.

 

 

_44584259_kyle226.jpg

Kyle: "Unlikely to have suffered massive blow to head"

 

Freed babysitter's jail torment

 

She was released from prison earlier this year after serving three years.

 

A spokesman for Cleveland Police said the force would not be reopening the case and would not be apologising to Ms Holdsworth, while the CPS defended the police's right to bring the case to court a second time.

 

During Ms Holdsworth's original trial she was accused of repeatedly banging Kyle's head against a wooden banister with as much force as a 60mph crash after losing her temper.

 

The Newsnight programme interviewed leading neuro-pathologist Dr Wainey Squier who later gave evidence for the defence in the retrial.

 

She said it was "unlikely" Kyle had suffered a massive blow to the head.

 

During the retrial the court heard the youngster had bruising and marks to his head but Ms Holdsworth's defence maintained they were inflicted the previous day - blaming Kyle's mother - and coupled with his brain abnormalities, led to the unexpected fit.

 

'Terrible experience'

 

Professor Renzo Guerrini, a paediatric neurologist at the University of Florence Children's Hospital, said: "In my opinion there is compelling evidence he had some head injury before this night.

 

"This might have been trivial but sufficient enough to produce bleeding on the brain which triggered the epileptic seizure which because of Kyle's brain condition was possibly prolonged."

 

Lee Spencer speaks on behalf of his partner, Suzanne Holdsworth

 

Standing next to Ms Holdsworth outside the court on Thursday, her partner Lee Spencer said: "This case has always been about Kyle, who was a loving child, a little boy, who Suzanne's always loved and helped look after.

 

"We know his family deeply loved him and miss him.

 

"Sadly we now know that he had some bad medical features that led to his sudden collapse and death.

 

"We hope that this knowledge will help his family come to terms with his death.

 

"This has been a terrible experience for Suzanne and our family and we now just want to try and pick up the pieces of our lives together."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/tees/7790362.stm

 

 

Freed babysitter's jail torment

 

_44598062_holdsworth.226index.jpg

Suzanne Holdsworth was called a "nonce" in prison

 

From the moment she was convicted of child murder babysitter Suzanne Holdsworth was mentally abused and taunted in jail.

 

But the 38-year-old does not blame her fellow inmates for their treatment of her during the three years she was locked up for the killing of two-year-old Kyle Fisher.

 

Speaking to the BBC by telephone from prison, she said: "When I went in I was abused and called a 'nonce'.

 

"I would go back to my cell and cry and cry and cry.

 

"But I can't fault people, I would have been exactly the same. They thought I was a murderer.

 

"But I was innocent and had done nothing wrong."

 

Ms Holdsworth's nightmare began in 2004 when she was looking after Kyle, the son of her teenage neighbour Clare Fisher.

 

Ms Holdsworth was caring for him at her home in Hartlepool when he suffered a fit.

 

 

There was an embarrassingly poor evaluation of evidence by the prosecution

Prof Bill Dobyns, Chicago University

Babysitter cleared of murder

 

During her 999 call she said the youngster's eyes were rolling and he had gone floppy.

 

But the police insisted the former supermarket worker had battered Kyle's head against the banister in her home in Millpool Close in a bout of rage.

 

In March 2005, a jury agreed with the prosecution case and Ms Holdsworth was given a life sentence and told she would spend at least 10 years behind bars.

 

But according to experts for the defence the case against her was deeply flawed.

 

During the retrial Professor Bill Dobyns, of the Department of Human Genetics at Chicago University, condemned the investigation.

 

Prof Dobyns, who has been studying the brains of young children for 25 years, said the medical evidence did not support a murder charge and trying someone for killing the toddler was "embarrassing".

 

He said Kyle was vulnerable with complex developmental problems.

 

'Patently ridiculous'

 

He had water on his brain, a brain that was a lot larger that normal and had many abnormal cells. He was also predisposed to epilepsy.

 

Prof Dobyns said that the "mild to moderate" bruises on Kyle's face were just not consistent with him suffering a severe head injury.

 

 

There were no obvious signs of injury and little doubt he had a fit

Prof Dobyns

 

He said: "It is patently ridiculous - the prosecution clearly did not look at this boy in any way, shape or form.

 

"Then when the developmental disorders were discovered they were ignored by the prosecution.

 

"There were so many other features here that were not consistent with a severe blow to the head.

 

"It was almost embarrassing - it seemed a difficult case, but in fact it wasn't - there were clues up front that could have been looked at and led to further studies.

 

"There was an embarrassingly poor evaluation of evidence by the prosecution."

 

In Prof Dobyn's opinion, Kyle died of water on the brain and an epileptic fit.

 

He added: "This was a perfect storm of unfavourable events - anything is possible but there is a more reasonable explanation.

 

"There were no obvious signs of injury and little doubt he had a fit."

 

_44584259_kyle226.jpg

Kyle Fisher had suffered a head injury that left him with a drooping eye

 

Throughout Ms Holdsworth's trial, the most common picture shown of the little boy shows a beaming Kyle with a prominently drooping right eye.

 

This was triggered by a fall some months previous to his death during which he fractured his eye socket.

 

Behind the eye there was a hole the size of a coin and he was due to have an operation.

 

According to the prosecution the long-standing injury had nothing to do with his death.

 

But according to Prof Dobyns: "Kyle Fisher was never a normal boy.

 

"He was walking and talking, but part of his brain was hanging down into his eye socket. He was vulnerable to medical complications."

 

Crucially, according to the defence, no evidence was found to prove the boy's head had been battered against the banister.

 

'No murderer'

 

No hair, tissue or blood was found, not even a dent in the wood, according to Neil Garton, a forensic scientist.

 

Ms Holdsworth's partner Lee Spencer has never doubted her innocence.

 

He said: "I've known Suzanne for 18 years of my life and she is no murderer.

 

"If I thought she could ever snap in the way that they say she did, she would never be near my children."

 

Even Kyle's father, John Taylor, is still bewildered that she was ever convicted in the first place, and believes she was in the wrong place at the wrong time."

 

He said: "It just happened to be that she was babysitting.

 

"I could have been babysitting that night and could have been the one who was sent to prison."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/tees/7789169.stm

 

 

 

Almost from the beginning the police ignored the facts and just went for a conviction, utterly disgusting. :aye:

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God help us from the British Police

 

The Colin Stagg case defies belief - they had a guy who had a history of raping young mums and then they go and fit up an innocent man

 

Fop will have you believe they plan it that way rather than just being incompetent.

 

 

The Robert Napper issue was one of incompetence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

However the below is as good an example of the Police fitting up a completely innocent person as you will ever see:

 

 

 

 

Babysitter not guilty of murder

_45285783_36068f3f-9cf1-41b1-b8ef-f69d708fe90e.jpg

Suzanne Holdsworth always denied murdering the toddler

 

A babysitter who spent three years in prison for the murder of a neighbour's two-year-old son has been found not guilty at a retrial.

 

Suzanne Holdsworth had been accused of banging Kyle Fisher's head against a banister in Hartlepool in July 2004.

 

Ms Holdsworth, 38, now of Boggart Hill Drive, Leeds, was convicted in 2005.

 

However, doubts were raised about her conviction by journalist John Sweeney in a report for BBC Newsnight and it was quashed in May.

 

The jury at the retrial at Teesside Crown Court deliberated for two days before returning the not guilty verdict.

 

The mother-of-two was originally convicted of the murder in March 2005 and jailed for life.

 

 

_44584259_kyle226.jpg

Kyle: "Unlikely to have suffered massive blow to head"

 

Freed babysitter's jail torment

 

She was released from prison earlier this year after serving three years.

 

A spokesman for Cleveland Police said the force would not be reopening the case and would not be apologising to Ms Holdsworth, while the CPS defended the police's right to bring the case to court a second time.

 

During Ms Holdsworth's original trial she was accused of repeatedly banging Kyle's head against a wooden banister with as much force as a 60mph crash after losing her temper.

 

The Newsnight programme interviewed leading neuro-pathologist Dr Wainey Squier who later gave evidence for the defence in the retrial.

 

She said it was "unlikely" Kyle had suffered a massive blow to the head.

 

During the retrial the court heard the youngster had bruising and marks to his head but Ms Holdsworth's defence maintained they were inflicted the previous day - blaming Kyle's mother - and coupled with his brain abnormalities, led to the unexpected fit.

 

'Terrible experience'

 

Professor Renzo Guerrini, a paediatric neurologist at the University of Florence Children's Hospital, said: "In my opinion there is compelling evidence he had some head injury before this night.

 

"This might have been trivial but sufficient enough to produce bleeding on the brain which triggered the epileptic seizure which because of Kyle's brain condition was possibly prolonged."

 

Lee Spencer speaks on behalf of his partner, Suzanne Holdsworth

 

Standing next to Ms Holdsworth outside the court on Thursday, her partner Lee Spencer said: "This case has always been about Kyle, who was a loving child, a little boy, who Suzanne's always loved and helped look after.

 

"We know his family deeply loved him and miss him.

 

"Sadly we now know that he had some bad medical features that led to his sudden collapse and death.

 

"We hope that this knowledge will help his family come to terms with his death.

 

"This has been a terrible experience for Suzanne and our family and we now just want to try and pick up the pieces of our lives together."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/tees/7790362.stm

 

 

Freed babysitter's jail torment

 

_44598062_holdsworth.226index.jpg

Suzanne Holdsworth was called a "nonce" in prison

 

From the moment she was convicted of child murder babysitter Suzanne Holdsworth was mentally abused and taunted in jail.

 

But the 38-year-old does not blame her fellow inmates for their treatment of her during the three years she was locked up for the killing of two-year-old Kyle Fisher.

 

Speaking to the BBC by telephone from prison, she said: "When I went in I was abused and called a 'nonce'.

 

"I would go back to my cell and cry and cry and cry.

 

"But I can't fault people, I would have been exactly the same. They thought I was a murderer.

 

"But I was innocent and had done nothing wrong."

 

Ms Holdsworth's nightmare began in 2004 when she was looking after Kyle, the son of her teenage neighbour Clare Fisher.

 

Ms Holdsworth was caring for him at her home in Hartlepool when he suffered a fit.

 

 

There was an embarrassingly poor evaluation of evidence by the prosecution

Prof Bill Dobyns, Chicago University

Babysitter cleared of murder

 

During her 999 call she said the youngster's eyes were rolling and he had gone floppy.

 

But the police insisted the former supermarket worker had battered Kyle's head against the banister in her home in Millpool Close in a bout of rage.

 

In March 2005, a jury agreed with the prosecution case and Ms Holdsworth was given a life sentence and told she would spend at least 10 years behind bars.

 

But according to experts for the defence the case against her was deeply flawed.

 

During the retrial Professor Bill Dobyns, of the Department of Human Genetics at Chicago University, condemned the investigation.

 

Prof Dobyns, who has been studying the brains of young children for 25 years, said the medical evidence did not support a murder charge and trying someone for killing the toddler was "embarrassing".

 

He said Kyle was vulnerable with complex developmental problems.

 

'Patently ridiculous'

 

He had water on his brain, a brain that was a lot larger that normal and had many abnormal cells. He was also predisposed to epilepsy.

 

Prof Dobyns said that the "mild to moderate" bruises on Kyle's face were just not consistent with him suffering a severe head injury.

 

 

There were no obvious signs of injury and little doubt he had a fit

Prof Dobyns

 

He said: "It is patently ridiculous - the prosecution clearly did not look at this boy in any way, shape or form.

 

"Then when the developmental disorders were discovered they were ignored by the prosecution.

 

"There were so many other features here that were not consistent with a severe blow to the head.

 

"It was almost embarrassing - it seemed a difficult case, but in fact it wasn't - there were clues up front that could have been looked at and led to further studies.

 

"There was an embarrassingly poor evaluation of evidence by the prosecution."

 

In Prof Dobyn's opinion, Kyle died of water on the brain and an epileptic fit.

 

He added: "This was a perfect storm of unfavourable events - anything is possible but there is a more reasonable explanation.

 

"There were no obvious signs of injury and little doubt he had a fit."

 

_44584259_kyle226.jpg

Kyle Fisher had suffered a head injury that left him with a drooping eye

 

Throughout Ms Holdsworth's trial, the most common picture shown of the little boy shows a beaming Kyle with a prominently drooping right eye.

 

This was triggered by a fall some months previous to his death during which he fractured his eye socket.

 

Behind the eye there was a hole the size of a coin and he was due to have an operation.

 

According to the prosecution the long-standing injury had nothing to do with his death.

 

But according to Prof Dobyns: "Kyle Fisher was never a normal boy.

 

"He was walking and talking, but part of his brain was hanging down into his eye socket. He was vulnerable to medical complications."

 

Crucially, according to the defence, no evidence was found to prove the boy's head had been battered against the banister.

 

'No murderer'

 

No hair, tissue or blood was found, not even a dent in the wood, according to Neil Garton, a forensic scientist.

 

Ms Holdsworth's partner Lee Spencer has never doubted her innocence.

 

He said: "I've known Suzanne for 18 years of my life and she is no murderer.

 

"If I thought she could ever snap in the way that they say she did, she would never be near my children."

 

Even Kyle's father, John Taylor, is still bewildered that she was ever convicted in the first place, and believes she was in the wrong place at the wrong time."

 

He said: "It just happened to be that she was babysitting.

 

"I could have been babysitting that night and could have been the one who was sent to prison."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/tees/7789169.stm

 

 

 

Almost from the beginning the police ignored the facts and just went for a conviction, utterly disgusting. :D

 

If the police did fit her up intentionally, I wonder what the original defence team, judge and jury were playing at to go along with it. :aye:

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If the police did fit her up intentionally, I wonder what the original defence team, judge and jury were playing at to go along with it. B)

 

Cunningly they (police/CPS) just didn't make much of the relevant information available to the defence, amazing that isn't it? Who'd have thought of that one? :D:aye:

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In fact in her case even one of the Sgt's involved in the investigation brought up the issue of why they weren't going down different avenues, but she was told to shut up by superiors and basically ostracised from the rest of the team for daring to look at the truth rather than the conviction. :aye:

 

One of the scariest cases in recent times, especially given all the stuff that's come out about the mother in the re-trial.

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Not that it should impact on the murder conviction, but she seemed at least guilty of neglect/abuse which probably didn't help her case and encouraged some fitting up. Wouldn't have happened to a normal mother.

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Not that it should impact on the murder conviction, but she seemed at least guilty of neglect/abuse which probably didn't help her case and encouraged some fitting up. Wouldn't have happened to a normal mother.

 

The mother was yes (she caused or at least was the only one there when the initial brain/eye injury occurred, and was the only one there the prior day when the light bruising to his head occurred), the baby sitter not really.

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Guest alex

Read a bit in the newspapers and I watched a bit of that doc about the Colin Stagg case. Absolutely terrible really. Even worse because the other bloke (i.e. the one who actually did it) went on to kill others.

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Not that it should impact on the murder conviction, but she seemed at least guilty of neglect/abuse which probably didn't help her case and encouraged some fitting up. Wouldn't have happened to a normal mother.

The mother is definitely guilty of something.

 

I see Cleveland Police are refusing to make an apology to the babysitter. I assume the reason for that is accepting they got it wrong would open them up to a pretty serious damages claim?

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Not that it should impact on the murder conviction, but she seemed at least guilty of neglect/abuse which probably didn't help her case and encouraged some fitting up. Wouldn't have happened to a normal mother.

The mother is definitely guilty of something.

 

I see Cleveland Police are refusing to make an apology to the babysitter. I assume the reason for that is accepting they got it wrong would open them up to a pretty serious damages claim?

 

 

The babysitter (who spent 3 years in prison for it) basically had a case manufactured against her by the police and CPS because she happened to be there.

 

A lot of it was blatantly ridiculous - saying she's banged his head repeatedly against the banister that night yet the wounds not being consistent with that and there being no blood, tissue or even DNA on said banister.

 

She's definitely someone that deserves a big payout.

 

 

 

 

 

The mother, well at best she got away with shocking criminal neglect, at worst she maybe she got away with murder. :lol:

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The 'Honey trap' officer involved in wrongly convicting Colin Stagg received £125k for stress. Rachel Nickell's child, who witnessed the murder of his mother, got £90k. Something not right there.

 

the police are never wrong in Modern England

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God help us from the British Police

 

The Colin Stagg case defies belief - they had a guy who had a history of raping young mums and then they go and fit up an innocent man

 

Two terrible miscarriages of justice yes and in Stagg's case compelling evidence against the case for capital punishment.

 

However, you have to take these in the context of thousands of sound prosecutions. I still believe we have the best justice system in the world.

 

for once, I agree with you [its Xmas after all :lol: ]

 

Rob "let them off" W strikes again

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