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Nordic diet better than Med meals.

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Nordic diet as healthy as Mediterranean foods

Olive oil, vegetables, citrus fruit and unrefined cereals from the Mediterranean may be replaced in slimmers' shopping baskets by Scandinavian rapeseed oil, elk and berries such as cowberries and cloudberries.

 

By Richard Gray, Science Correspondent

Last Updated: 3:13PM GMT 14 Mar 2009

The Mediterranean diet – one of the leading eating plans for the past 20 years – is facing competition from the "Nordic diet", which, scientists are finding, could be significantly healthier.

The findings have generated excitement among many nutrition experts in the United Kingdom as the British climate is more suited to producing the kinds of foods found in Scandinavia than it is to growing the sun-ripened foods of the Mediterranean.

 

Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, in Denmark, have set up a EURO 13.3 million (£12.2 million) project aimed at identifying and testing more products from the region that can fit into the "New Nordic Diet". They also plan to carry out trials with schoolchildren to see how the diet can help improve their health.

Professor Arne Astrup, president of the International Association for the Study of Obesity and head of the department of human nutrition at Copenhagen University, is leading the project.

He said: "The plan is to develop a counterpart to the Mediterranean diet that is superior in terms of health effects and palatability."

In Finland, around 23 per cent of people are obese; in Sweden, the figure is as low as 10 per cent; but in the UK, the number is around 25 per cent.

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Nordic diet as healthy as Mediterranean foods

Olive oil, vegetables, citrus fruit and unrefined cereals from the Mediterranean may be replaced in slimmers' shopping baskets by Scandinavian rapeseed oil, elk and berries such as cowberries and cloudberries.

 

By Richard Gray, Science Correspondent

Last Updated: 3:13PM GMT 14 Mar 2009

The Mediterranean diet – one of the leading eating plans for the past 20 years – is facing competition from the "Nordic diet", which, scientists are finding, could be significantly healthier.

The findings have generated excitement among many nutrition experts in the United Kingdom as the British climate is more suited to producing the kinds of foods found in Scandinavia than it is to growing the sun-ripened foods of the Mediterranean.

 

Scientists at the University of Copenhagen, in Denmark, have set up a EURO 13.3 million (£12.2 million) project aimed at identifying and testing more products from the region that can fit into the "New Nordic Diet". They also plan to carry out trials with schoolchildren to see how the diet can help improve their health.

Professor Arne Astrup, president of the International Association for the Study of Obesity and head of the department of human nutrition at Copenhagen University, is leading the project.

He said: "The plan is to develop a counterpart to the Mediterranean diet that is superior in terms of health effects and palatability."

In Finland, around 23 per cent of people are obese; in Sweden, the figure is as low as 10 per cent; but in the UK, the number is around 25 per cent.

 

Palatability? :o

 

I'm not sure the University of Copenhagen will have a completely objective viewpoint on this.

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Guest alex
In Sweden, the figure is as low as 10 per cent

What does that mean btw? It's actually higher than that but we'll ignore urban areas?

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In Sweden, the figure is as low as 10 per cent

What does that mean btw? It's actually higher than that but we'll ignore urban areas?

 

Just bad use of English I would imagine. Probably means the same as the others, i.e. approximately 10%. I suspect it's got something to do with porn personally.

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In Sweden, the figure is as low as 10 per cent

What does that mean btw? It's actually higher than that but we'll ignore urban areas?

 

Just bad use of English I would imagine.

Aye. "In Sweden, the figure is 10%, which is low" basically. Doesn't read quite as smoothly that way though. :o

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In Sweden, the figure is as low as 10 per cent

What does that mean btw? It's actually higher than that but we'll ignore urban areas?

 

Just bad use of English I would imagine. Probably means the same as the others, i.e. approximately 10%. I suspect it's got something to do with porn personally.

Your probably right.

 

And yes, that was intentional.

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