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Fishy

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Just fucking about with the macro side of the Olympus Pen. I'm off a fair bit this week, so will try wandering round the park to try and get some Landscape ones.

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I enjoy messing with Macro, be doing a lot more when weather turns and I'm in the garden more. Do you use a tripod? Sounds a bit faffy but best investment I made.

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Well, with a tripod you can make your naturally steady as a rock hand God like. Especially in dark surrounds where macro is very difficult. Also if you want really close macro to control the depth of field where even your breathing can throw it out of focus.

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Well, with a tripod you can make your naturally steady as a rock hand God like. Especially in dark surrounds where macro is very difficult. Also if you want really close macro to control the depth of field where even your breathing can throw it out of focus.

:D

 

I might pick one up after I get back from the states.

 

For Landscape photos, am I right in thinking it's best to pick up a polarising filter, is there anything else I'd need?

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Well, with a tripod you can make your naturally steady as a rock hand God like. Especially in dark surrounds where macro is very difficult. Also if you want really close macro to control the depth of field where even your breathing can throw it out of focus.

:D

 

I might pick one up after I get back from the states.

 

For Landscape photos, am I right in thinking it's best to pick up a polarising filter, is there anything else I'd need?

 

Poloriser is useful especially if you have water droplets anywhere on the image. this might be tree's, lakes and so on. But it can also help give greater contrast in a blue sky with clouds. However, Id be going for a ND Grad filter before.

 

I use the Cokin filter system so that I can mount a couple of filters at the same time (namely these two above). But if you really want to do Landscape, Id go for a strong grad filter first. Unless of course you are handy in photoshop. The problem with landscape is that the land is much darker than the sky, so if you meter for the landscape, the sky is over exposed and if you meter for the sky the ground is under expoded. The filter brings the two closer together by darkening the sky. The alternative is to use photoshop. You could take two images, one exposed for sky and one for land, then blend the two.

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Well, with a tripod you can make your naturally steady as a rock hand God like. Especially in dark surrounds where macro is very difficult. Also if you want really close macro to control the depth of field where even your breathing can throw it out of focus.

:D

 

I might pick one up after I get back from the states.

 

For Landscape photos, am I right in thinking it's best to pick up a polarising filter, is there anything else I'd need?

 

Poloriser is useful especially if you have water droplets anywhere on the image. this might be tree's, lakes and so on. But it can also help give greater contrast in a blue sky with clouds. However, Id be going for a ND Grad filter before.

 

I use the Cokin filter system so that I can mount a couple of filters at the same time (namely these two above). But if you really want to do Landscape, Id go for a strong grad filter first. Unless of course you are handy in photoshop. The problem with landscape is that the land is much darker than the sky, so if you meter for the landscape, the sky is over exposed and if you meter for the sky the ground is under expoded. The filter brings the two closer together by darkening the sky. The alternative is to use photoshop. You could take two images, one exposed for sky and one for land, then blend the two.

:D cheers Jawd

 

With the Cokin kits, is it wise to buy the best I can, then bring my ability up to their level, or buy a cheaper set and see how far and how comfortable I get with them?

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Well, with a tripod you can make your naturally steady as a rock hand God like. Especially in dark surrounds where macro is very difficult. Also if you want really close macro to control the depth of field where even your breathing can throw it out of focus.

:D

 

I might pick one up after I get back from the states.

 

For Landscape photos, am I right in thinking it's best to pick up a polarising filter, is there anything else I'd need?

 

Poloriser is useful especially if you have water droplets anywhere on the image. this might be tree's, lakes and so on. But it can also help give greater contrast in a blue sky with clouds. However, Id be going for a ND Grad filter before.

 

I use the Cokin filter system so that I can mount a couple of filters at the same time (namely these two above). But if you really want to do Landscape, Id go for a strong grad filter first. Unless of course you are handy in photoshop. The problem with landscape is that the land is much darker than the sky, so if you meter for the landscape, the sky is over exposed and if you meter for the sky the ground is under expoded. The filter brings the two closer together by darkening the sky. The alternative is to use photoshop. You could take two images, one exposed for sky and one for land, then blend the two.

:D cheers Jawd

 

With the Cokin kits, is it wise to buy the best I can, then bring my ability up to their level, or buy a cheaper set and see how far and how comfortable I get with them?

 

Well, I think there are 4 sizes and I went for the P series which I think seems to be the most common. If you do buy any of them, you need 3 things. You have the frame which the filter slots into, the filters themselves and then an adapter ring that the frame fits to. You need a different ring for each lens as lenses are different diameters. I bought a ring light (bit like an always on flash for macro work) and that came with a full set of rings for all sorts of different sized lenses so it was really handy.

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