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FIFA has chosen the slogans for the squad busses and there is so much cringe in the names.

 

 

 

:jesuswept: Some of those are horrific.

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Korea

 

"Enjoy it, reds!" :lol:

I expect to hear that in a 90s Arnie action Movie, just after he's sent them a bomb disguised as a prostitute, or something.

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I expect to hear that in a 90s Arnie action Movie, just after he's sent them a bomb disguised as a prostitute, or something.

 

:lol:

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Anyone watch the Julien Temple doc on BBC1 last night?

 

Rio 50 Degrees: Carry on CaRIOca

 

 

We’ll be hearing a lot about Brazil and its larger than life city Rio de Janeiro over the next few months, as the World Cup circus arrives in town. The global celebration of football promises to rival Rio’s famous carnival for noise and spectacle, but anyone wishing to catch a glimpse of the real city behind the headlines should watch the stunning film Rio 50 Degrees: Carry on CaRIOca, which has been made for Imagine… by Julien Temple.

 

The director, who began his career with the controversial 1980 film about The Sex Pistols The Great Rock’n’Roll Swindle had a brief flirtation with Hollywood in the Eighties, alongside building a successful career in music videos. But in documentaries such as Requiem for Detroit? (2010) and London – The Modern Babylon (2012), Temple has shown himself to be an ever-more eloquent poet of place.

 

Rio 50 Degrees is a blaze of colour and music that captures the city and its people from the ground up. The “Cariocas” of the title range from its well-born mayor Eduardo Paes to those who have lived in the vertiginous favelas all their lives.

 

For Temple, it was a return to a city that he had unexpectedly got to know well while making The Great Rock’n’Roll Swindle, which included scenes shot with on-the-run train robber Ronnie Biggs from his tropical exile.

 

 

“The last thing we shot with the Pistols was in the Bay of Rio on a boat,” Temple recalls, “and as they finished their performance they threw all the instruments into the sea. Back at the quayside we had to explain to this mafia guy who’d rented them to us that they’d thrown them overboard, and he said, well who’s going to pay for it. [The band’s manager] Malcolm [McLaren] said, ‘We don’t have any money,’ and then he looked around at me and said, ‘Julien will stay as human surety for the debt and we’ll send it on Monday.’ [Then, to me] ‘Julien, go to the post office on Monday and the money will be there.’”

“Of course it wasn’t, and I was there for six weeks with no money to eat; I had to basically beg at fruit juice stalls. So I got to know the city from the gutter up. This was during the dictatorship, which was a very strange time. The people were very friendly, but it was a dangerous place at the time.”

 

Rio’s troubled past, including its long history of slavery, and the years of dictatorship that followed the 1964 military coup, is brought to vivid life in Rio 50 Degrees.

 

I ask Temple if the city seemed more dangerous than it had 35 years ago. He recalls how the first time he was there, people weren’t stopping at red lights for fear of having their wrist watches (and hands) removed by machete, but he says. “The favelas certainly are more dangerous now, because the drug war that we explore in the film happened after I was first there. But the whole coastal strip is much more advanced. Being on the beach at night doesn’t feel dangerous now, whereas it did, hugely, in the past.”

 

The favelas, some of which had become no-go zones for police, have been subject to a programme of “pacification” in preparation for the World Cup and 2016 Olympics. Filming in the favelas which haven’t been “pacified”, however, presented a problem for the film-maker. “You can’t film there unless you have a way in. We had a DJ guy who’s in the film called DJ Pitbull, who is revered there, and he got us in to various funk balls (favela dance parties). But we still had to have a guy walking in front of the camera with us with an Uzi.

 

“We had one bizarre experience in a pacified favela, where there was a police checkpoint at the bottom of the hill. We were allowed in by the police, but then there was another checkpoint halfway up which was run by the druglords… It can switch on a sixpence, the feeling of everything being fine to becoming scary.”

 

The film was shot before the citizens of Rio took to the streets last year to protest against perceived corruption in the way that contracts have been awarded for the World Cup and Olympics.

 

I wonder if Temple worries that he could be accused of taking sides. “I think a film is your personal distillation of what you see… and that kind of blatant corruption among the friends of the politicians who run the place, who run hotels and construction companies, shouldn’t be allowed. I find it distasteful.”

 

Temple has plans to return to drama. (Fans of actress Juno Temple, his daughter, will note that he gave her her first role – in his 1997 film Vigo: Passion for Life. He’s very proud of her recent Bafta Rising Star award, although he admits, “I tried to talk her out of an acting career. I know how hard it is.”) He got half way through making a film about Marvin Gaye in Ostend last year before “the money ran out”. But he’s soon to begin shooting a drama about the turbulent relationship between The Kinks’ brothers Ray and Dave Davies.

 

Music has been a constant in Temple’s career, and it is music that gives Rio 50 Degrees its pulsing energy. There won’t be a better portrait of the city between now and the World Cup, perhaps not for a long time.

 

It's on iPlayer for a fortnight and it's superb.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b044jg7d/imagine-summer-2014-1-rio-50-degrees-carry-on-carioca

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Whole thing's subtitled, too much effort. Turned off.

 

If you turn on the BBC's subtitles they only pop up to tell you the name and artist of the songs being used. Should be an option on every BluRay disc that.

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Love the way people on here go to the effort of digging out an ancient thread instead of starting a new one. Bit of handbags going on between Stevie and Meenzer

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Love the way people on here go to the effort of digging out an ancient thread instead of starting a new one. Bit of handbags going on between Stevie and Meenzer

 

:lol:

 

Never noticed that. Quality.

 

Today's Brazilian themed video is an older classic, The Boys From Brazil. Great job by Motty. Taken from the original VHS so not greeat quality, but the full thing is on Youtube.

 

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...and Todays Brazilian themed film is Bus 174

 

 

 

Bus 174 is a Brazilian documentary film released on October 22, 2002. A young man from a poor background, held passengers on a bus hostage for four hours. The event was caught live on television. The movie examines the incident and what life is like in the slums and favelas of Rio de Janeiro and how the criminal justice system in Brazil treats the lower classes. Within the film, Padilha interviews former and current street children, members of the Rio police force, the Rio BOPE police team, family members, and sociologists in order to gain insight into what led Nascimento to carry out the hijacking.

 

Bus 174 was voted "one of the ten best films of the year" by The New York Times. It has won over 23 prizes worldwide, including an Emmy Award for Outstanding Cultural & Artistic Programming in 2005 (after being shown on HBO/Cinemax with great success), and the Amnesty Award in the Netherlands.

 

Bus 174 achieved a rare 99% critics rating at Rotten Tomatoes.

 

"If City Of God cracked the skin, Bus 174 digs deep into the wound. An astounding, depressing triumph."

-Empire

 

 

:)

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Switching to a world cup theme rather than a Brazillian one.

 

The official 1990 film.

 

Edward Woodward brings outstanding diction to the table.

 

Best World Cup ever

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