Jump to content
Kevin Carr's Gloves

Die Fußball-Bundesliga 2015/16

Recommended Posts

Amid the tedious Bayern dominance, I hadn't noticed Nuremberg's record at the halfway stage of the season. No wins, 11 draws, 6 defeats, and still not bottom of the table. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/25647442

 

Are brilliant Bayern Munich making the Bundesliga boring?

The German top-flight's winter break should have been about rest and recuperation for Bundesliga players and coaches.

But one question will have been driving them to distraction; how can we compete with Bayern Munich?

After a five-week absence, the Bundesliga returns on Friday when the leaders - and defending champions - travel to Borussia Monchengladbach.

Pep Guardiola's men are seven points ahead of nearest rivals Bayer Leverkusen, with last season's runners-up Borussia Dortmund 12 points adrift in fourth, as the second half of the campaign kicks off.

And, in a further demonstration of their power, the Champions League and Club World Cup holders announced earlier this month that Dortmund's prized asset Robert Lewandowski will join them in the summer.

"Bayern aren't from this world at the moment," Leverkusen sporting director and former Germany forward Rudi Voller told BBC Sport.

"The danger is very real that it will be boring at the top."

In 2013, Bayern broke records, won five trophies and hired one of the world's best coaches when Guardiola replaced the retiring Jupp Heynckes.

So let's put their domination in the context of English football. Since Bayern last lost in the Bundesliga, Chelsea have had three managers. English Premier League clubs have spent more £600m in transfer fees. A total of 14 players have made their international debuts for England.

That last Bundesliga defeat was way back in October 2012, when Sidney Sam's late header gave Leverkusen a 2-1 victory at the Allianz Arena.

The unbeaten run stretches to 41 matches.

"Bayern are playing a similar role to the one Barcelona played in Spain - they're virtually unbeatable and outplay most opponents," says Voller, who scored 47 goals in 90 games for Germany between 1982 and 1994.

"Borussia Dortmund have managed to battle back a little bit over the last few years, but not this year.

"This season, we have been close in terms of points, but Bayern's quality is not just in their starting 11 but also in the 11 after that. It is so high."

Voller was one of the greatest strikers in the history of German football and coached the national team when they reached the 2002 World Cup final.

This season, he watched from the stands as head coach Sami Hyypia guided Leverkusen to a 1-1 home draw against Bayern.

Since then, Leverkusen have overtaken Dortmund as Bayern's closest rivals at the top, but Voller admits the battles in other areas of the table are becoming more exciting than the title race.

"What's important is that there are other groups that are interesting," he adds. "Those playing for the Champions League spots, the Europa League places or the relegation candidates for example. That keeps the league exciting."

In the last 10 years, four teams have managed to beat Bayern to the Bundesliga title: Werder Bremen (2003-4), Stuttgart (2006-7), Wolfsburg (2008-9) and Dortmund (2010-11 and 2011-12).

Last season, though, second-placed Dortmund finished 25 points behind Bayern - and all four of those teams are now wondering how they are ever going to catch the reigning champions again.

"To be honest that's the most difficult question within the Bundesliga at the moment," says Stuttgart sporting director Jochen Schneider. "Bayern are far, far away from every other team, so it's quite difficult.

"One team dominating in that way is something we can't like, but remember it happened also in the 70s and the 80s when Bayern Munich dominated for a certain period.

"It's going to be very tough to win the title again but when we look back to 2006, the year before we last won the league, it was nearly the same situation - so in football, everything can happen.

"We have to work hard every day. We have won the title five times in the history of the club and I'm quite sure we will win it again."

On the pitch, the Stuttgart players are also feeling the strain of trying to compete with Bayern.

They narrowly lost the German Cup final 3-2 to the treble winners in May and will play them for the first time this season on 29 January.

"I think for the moment, there's no chance against Bayern Munich," Stuttgart and Guinea winger Ibrahima Traore told BBC Sport.

"They are too good, they have too much quality, they have too many players who can make a difference in every game. I think in the league no team can beat them. That's how I feel.

"I don't think their dominance is good for the Bundesliga but what can we do against them? They're strong, they're powerful and they can play. Every team is starting to aim for second place, not for the title."

The other problem for Bayern's rivals is that the Bavarian side have the power and the money to sign all of the best young talents in Germany after they have been developed at other clubs.

The prime example is Mario Gotze, who started training with Borussia Dortmund at just eight years of age.

After moving from the academy to the first team he helped Dortmund win two Bundesliga titles and reach a Champions League final.

But last April, Bayern came calling with a £31.5m bid and Gotze controversially moved from the Westfalenstadion to the Allianz Arena last summer.

Then, to add insult to injury for Dortmund fans, Poland striker Lewandowski signed a pre-contract agreement to join Bayern in the summer.

Stuttgart also have one of the most successful youth academies in the country, producing Germany internationals Sami Khedira and Mario Gomez among others, but their sporting director agrees that it is difficult to begrudge Bayern for their success or their spending power.

"Sometimes it's a bit frustrating but on the other hand they've done a very good job for 40 years, it's the best club in Germany," Schneider says.

"And it's not that they won the money in the lottery or that a Russian guy came to give them lots of money - it's the result of their work. It's something you have to accept.

"It's our job to close that gap and we're working on that."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was going to say (and at least it's eventually pointed out in the article), it's not as if there haven't been periods of Bayern dominance before. In terms of pure trophy haul they're not really significantly more dominant than Manchester United have been over here in the Sky era - I suppose the difference is the way they'll occasionally click into gear and just steamroller all opposition all season long, whereas at least Fergie's lot had the good grace to make it a close fight on occasion...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Stuttgart also have one of the most successful youth academies in the country, producing Germany internationals Sami Khedira and Mario Gomez among others, but their sporting director agrees that it is difficult to begrudge Bayern for their success or their spending power.

 

"Sometimes it's a bit frustrating but on the other hand they've done a very good job for 40 years, it's the best club in Germany," Schneider says.

 

"And it's not that they won the money in the lottery or that a Russian guy came to give them lots of money - it's the result of their work. It's something you have to accept.

 

"It's our job to close that gap and we're working on that."

 

Refreshingly honest take on the situation. Have to respect that.

 

Wonder if Ashley has that attitude? ;)

 

I'm a Stuttgart guy. Wondering if they would be considered the NUFC of Bundesliga?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Do I get bonus points if you were drinking something at the time?

 

I would disproportionately enjoy an evening of spit-takes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gotta be Schalke.

Apart from their biggest rival being one of the best and most popular teams in Europe. It would've been even harder being a Newcastle fan if our biggest rival had been Man U or Arsenal rather than the mackems...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


 

Arsenal have moved a step closer to taking Schalke's Julian Draxler to the club with a deal expected to be finalised this weekend as Arsene Wenger's moves to consolidate his best chance of winning the Premier League title since his Invincible team of 2003-04.

Schalke and Arsenal are still in negotiations for the 20-year-old but the player wants to move to the club and the expectation on both sides is that a compromise will be reached this week.
Arsenal do not want to go higher than £30million while Schalke want close to £35m. Ultimately Arsenal are likely to agree to a deal with additional clauses that could bring the fee up to what Schalke want.
The fact that Arsenal are willing to spend another huge chunk of money just five months after obliterating their transfer record by signing Mesut Ozil for £42m will come as an enormous relief to fans.
Just as it seemed the club had lost their ability to get ahead in the transfer market, now there is renewed confidence at every level. It is 10 years since Arsenal truly dominated English football and, with Wenger's team now top of the League but short of attacking options up front, the club have decided not to rest on their laurels. Put simply, there may not be a better chance to win the title for some years and Arsenal do not want to let it slip by.
They started the January window fixed on a loan move, first for Alvaro Morata from Real Madrid, then for Mirko Vucinic from Juventus, conventional centre-forwards to provide back-up for Olivier Giroud.
The reason why Draxler was meant to be a summer buy - and why loan options were pursued this January - is because the player is not a centre-forward, hence Wenger's comment on Friday about not needing another 'wide player'. He does not, but Draxler is equally at home playing behind the striker. And Wenger sees much more in his game. He believes that he can emulate Thierry Henry and Robin van Persie and transform himself from being a wide left player into a centre-forward.
That process will not necessarily start immediately as Arsenal will attempt to ease Draxler into the hurly-burly of a Premier League title race and he is likely to play in his more natural positions for now, wide on the left and in the hole behind Giroud. But Arsenal's attacking options are beginning to stack up.
They are also becoming distinctly Germanic - at one stage on Friday night in the 4-0 FA Cup win over Coventry they had five Germans on the pitch in Per Mertesacker, Serge Gnabry, Gedion Zelalem, Ozil and Lukas Podolski.
And throughout the club there seems an entirely different attitude and spirit this season. Friday night's game at one stage saw Mertesacker deliver the mother of all reprimands to Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain after he gave the ball away, allowing Coventry a chance. Usually mild-mannered, Mertesacker looked more like Martin Keown confronting Ruud van Nistelrooy at Old Trafford, waving his arms wildly in the reprimand.
Arsenal, it seems, have a lower tolerance threshold for mistakes than previously. 'We set each other high standards and, if you do something that's not good enough, you can bet one of your team-mates will tell you,' said Oxlade-Chamberlain.
'I gave the ball away and it resulted in them hitting the post. I knew I did wrong there. Per just gave me a nice, friendly reminder and that's what you need.
'We do have characters now, strong characters with a lot of experience like Mathieu Flamini and Per, who have been around the game for a long time at a very high standard. And with new signings coming in that makes it even more exciting.
'This group of players, the spine of the team, have been together for two or three years. It's starting to form that togetherness and that helps in the style of playing.We know what we expect of each other. Even when we're not playing well, we know how to grind results out.'
It has been a while since an Arsenal player sounded so assured about his team's prospects. Add Draxler to the mix and that confidence will only surge again.
Wenger will be hoping that in itself will help propel him to the title.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Watched Bayern win 6-1 away at Wolfsburg yesterday. It's remarkable how Guardiola has actually improved upon what they achieved last season.


People like to throw at him he's only managed the best teams so can't be that good but he really is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Watched Bayern win 6-1 away at Wolfsburg yesterday. It's remarkable how Guardiola has actually improved upon what they achieved last season.
People like to throw at him he's only managed the best teams so can't be that good but he really is.

 

IMHO the most remarkable thing is that he changed their style of play. That's where other managers like Klinsmann and van Gaal didn't succeed and therefore failed in the end. For me Guardiola is a very good example what impact a manager can have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO the most remarkable thing is that he changed their style of play. That's where other managers like Klinsmann and van Gaal didn't succeed and therefore failed in the end. For me Guardiola is a very good example what impact a manager can have.

Baldy has done well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


Recent tweets

Toontastic Facebook

Donate to Toontastic

Keeping the lights on since... well ages ago
TT-Staff


×