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sammynb

Fairy bread?

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I had the strangest half conversation the other day with Gemmill via catmag's telephone call with him.

Anyway turns out both he and catmag didn't know what fairy bread is, amazing I know when you consider Gemmill loves all things pink, tbqfh.

 

So with the exception of those from the antipodes, anyone know what it is or are they just living in denial?

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I don't think I've ever heard of fairy bread. Especially not with Gemmill's explanation of what it is.

 

I quite like fairy cakes, though.

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The way he described it was: bread, butter, hundreds and thousands. No matter what you do with those ingredients, you're basically having a hundreds and thousands sandwich. It's what passes for party food in Australia apparently. :razz:

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never heard of it... couldn't sound like a more gay food stuff though.

 

same bracket as fairy cakes, french fancies and croque monsieur tbpf

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The way he described it was:  bread, butter, hundreds and thousands.  No matter what you do with those ingredients, you're basically having a hundreds and thousands sandwich.  It's what passes for party food in Australia apparently. :razz:

134315[/snapback]

National dish tbqfhyfgp :razz:

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Fairy bread is white bread lightly spread with margarine or butter, and then sprinkled with either sugar or more commonly Hundreds and Thousands (also known as sprinkles or nonpareils, a Masterfoods product consisting of small balls of coloured sugar intended to decorate cakes).

 

Fairy bread is served almost exclusively at children's parties in Australia and New Zealand as a sweet yet more filling alternative to lollies. Slices of the bread are typically cut into triangles and stacked tastefully on the host's paper plate.

 

It was originally made using finely chopped rose petals for colour and scent instead of the sugary lollies that are used today.

 

Before fairy-bread came about, Wales (and other UK locations) had been serving up "sugar-bread" for hundreds of years. This is almost similar, but they pour sugar onto a well-buttered slice of bread instead.

 

Like fairy cakes for poor people!

 

 

http://www.zdesign.com.au/eva/food/fairy-bread.html

Edited by The Mighty Hog

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Fairy bread is white bread lightly spread with margarine or butter, and then sprinkled with either sugar or more commonly Hundreds and Thousands (also known as sprinkles or nonpareils, a Masterfoods product consisting of small balls of coloured sugar intended to decorate cakes).

 

Fairy bread is served almost exclusively at children's parties in Australia and New Zealand as a sweet yet more filling alternative to lollies. Slices of the bread are typically cut into triangles and stacked tastefully on the host's paper plate.

 

It was originally made using finely chopped rose petals for colour and scent instead of the sugary lollies that are used today.

 

Before fairy-bread came about, Wales (and other UK locations) had been serving up "sugar-bread" for hundreds of years. This is almost similar, but they pour sugar onto a well-buttered slice of bread instead.

 

Like fairy cakes for poor people!

 

 

http://www.zdesign.com.au/eva/food/fairy-bread.html

134677[/snapback]

Well we are a nation of convicts, what do you expect?

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