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I'm starting school again on monday, yay. But when this year is done I figured I'd travel some, and some of my mates who I'm travelling with suggested Japan... the thing I'm wondering about is; have any of you guys ever been there and could recommend some decent but also cheap hotels and things to do and such?

 

I'm not expecting a 200 page book about Tokyo from you, just a link to the sites and hotels and such if you can be arsed :woosh:

Edited by ghoulert
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Every few months I think to myself "Right, I'm definitely going to organise a trip to Tokyo" normally after some film or other that's based there. Then I realise the astronomical cost of such a venture and demure*.

 

The idea of staying in one of them bed size rooms with a curtain separating you from everyone else would never be cheap enough to consider.

 

*Can you use that word there? I dunno, but it sounded right when I wrote it.

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Every few months I think to myself "Right, I'm definitely going to organise a trip to Tokyo" normally after some film or other that's based there. Then I realise the astronomical cost of such a venture and demure*.

 

The idea of staying in one of them bed size rooms with a curtain separating you from everyone else would never be cheap enough to consider.

 

*Can you use that word there? I dunno, but it sounded right when I wrote it.

Not really, but it never stops Fish. :woosh: Btw Ghoulert, I'd try N-O for a better response. More posters and more foreign posters in particular. I bet Rob's been mind.

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Every few months I think to myself "Right, I'm definitely going to organise a trip to Tokyo" normally after some film or other that's based there. Then I realise the astronomical cost of such a venture and demure*.

 

The idea of staying in one of them bed size rooms with a curtain separating you from everyone else would never be cheap enough to consider.

 

*Can you use that word there? I dunno, but it sounded right when I wrote it.

Not really, but it never stops Fish. :woosh: Btw Ghoulert, I'd try N-O for a better response. More posters and more foreign posters in particular. I bet Rob's been mind.

 

Would I have to say "demure from it"?

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Every few months I think to myself "Right, I'm definitely going to organise a trip to Tokyo" normally after some film or other that's based there. Then I realise the astronomical cost of such a venture and demure*.

 

The idea of staying in one of them bed size rooms with a curtain separating you from everyone else would never be cheap enough to consider.

 

*Can you use that word there? I dunno, but it sounded right when I wrote it.

Not really, but it never stops Fish. :woosh: Btw Ghoulert, I'd try N-O for a better response. More posters and more foreign posters in particular. I bet Rob's been mind.

 

Would I have to say "demure from it"?

It's an adhjective rather than a verb isn't it? Not sure you can use it as the latter. It's generally only applied to shyness/modesty in women I think. You mean as in 'shy away from' I take it? I'm honestly not sure mind, I just haven't seen it used in that context.

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Every few months I think to myself "Right, I'm definitely going to organise a trip to Tokyo" normally after some film or other that's based there. Then I realise the astronomical cost of such a venture and demure*.

 

The idea of staying in one of them bed size rooms with a curtain separating you from everyone else would never be cheap enough to consider.

 

*Can you use that word there? I dunno, but it sounded right when I wrote it.

Not really, but it never stops Fish. :woosh: Btw Ghoulert, I'd try N-O for a better response. More posters and more foreign posters in particular. I bet Rob's been mind.

 

Would I have to say "demure from it"?

It's an adhjective rather than a verb isn't it? Not sure you can use it as the latter. It's generally only applied to shyness/modesty in women I think. You mean as in 'shy away from' I take it? I'm honestly not sure mind, I just haven't seen it used in that context.

 

There are certain words in English that we tend to think of as sex-specific, even though they are not defined that way in dictionaries. In a recent survey we polled the Usage Panel on a number of these words. Two-thirds of the panel feels that vivacious can only be used of a female subject, as in the example _____ can be so vivacious at times, while more than 70 percent of the panelists believe only men or boys can be debonair. Similarly, a majority of panelists feel that saucy, sassy, pert, and demure can apply only to women or girls. 2

Surprisingly, 43 percent of the Usage Panel believes that wanton can apply to either women or men, and 64 percent believe the same of prim. If you use the words urbane, suave, or lecherous, however, a majority of panel members believe you should refer to a man. 3

Other interesting controversies include the adjective suave and the noun fellow. Sixty percent of the panel thought these words should be limited to men, leaving 40 percent who would in theory at least allow a woman to be described as a suave fellow.

 

:huff:

 

Perhaps I don't demure, maybe I balk, but to me that suggests I scoff at it, when I'm actually quite sad about it.

 

Needs a new word to be invented.

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I think I know the word you mean, but I can't remember what it is. I could just be imagining it though. We've had a similar conversation about a different (possibly nonexistent) word before and I don't think we got to the bottom of it then either.

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I need to watch more Call My Bluff.

 

Or Never Mind The Full Stops. Which I do quite enjoy when i catch it. Julian Fellowes is quite a humorous chap.

 

Anyway, sorry Ghoulert. This place has shared dorms for less than £20 a night, and double rooms for around £40.

 

http://www.sakura-hotel.co.jp/sakura-hotel_rates.html

 

Note that it also states "Day Time Rates -- 2,100 Yen for 4 hours / 735 Yen for an hour, per person including tax."

 

:)

 

About £10 for somewhere she can "Love you long time", £4 for somewhere to get "sucky, sucky".

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Laugh if you will, but at lot of the guys on the arcade forums go to tokyo a lot. Its a good place to ask. I think its the Number 1 most expenisve city in the world though so get saving

 

 

but WHICH Tokyo - there seem to be soooo many.................

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Every few months I think to myself "Right, I'm definitely going to organise a trip to Tokyo" normally after some film or other that's based there. Then I realise the astronomical cost of such a venture and demure*.

 

The idea of staying in one of them bed size rooms with a curtain separating you from everyone else would never be cheap enough to consider.

 

*Can you use that word there? I dunno, but it sounded right when I wrote it.

Not really, but it never stops Fish. :) Btw Ghoulert, I'd try N-O for a better response. More posters and more foreign posters in particular. I bet Rob's been mind.

 

Would I have to say "demure from it"?

It's an adhjective rather than a verb isn't it? Not sure you can use it as the latter. It's generally only applied to shyness/modesty in women I think. You mean as in 'shy away from' I take it? I'm honestly not sure mind, I just haven't seen it used in that context.

 

There are certain words in English that we tend to think of as sex-specific, even though they are not defined that way in dictionaries. In a recent survey we polled the Usage Panel on a number of these words. Two-thirds of the panel feels that vivacious can only be used of a female subject, as in the example _____ can be so vivacious at times, while more than 70 percent of the panelists believe only men or boys can be debonair. Similarly, a majority of panelists feel that saucy, sassy, pert, and demure can apply only to women or girls. 2

Surprisingly, 43 percent of the Usage Panel believes that wanton can apply to either women or men, and 64 percent believe the same of prim. If you use the words urbane, suave, or lecherous, however, a majority of panel members believe you should refer to a man. 3

Other interesting controversies include the adjective suave and the noun fellow. Sixty percent of the panel thought these words should be limited to men, leaving 40 percent who would in theory at least allow a woman to be described as a suave fellow.

 

:)

 

Perhaps I don't demure, maybe I balk, but to me that suggests I scoff at it, when I'm actually quite sad about it.

 

Needs a new word to be invented.

 

Mrs hips would love to go to Japan, but it doesn't appeal to me. Maybe I will take her for our 25th anniversary in a copule of years time; surely such a good treat would mean her allowing me to shag her mates? Seems a good deal to me.

 

btw, the word you were thinking of is 'demur'.

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