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Emre on today's game:

 

EMRE is happy with the way things are going at his new club after another impressive performance in the friendly win over Yeading on Saturday.

 

The Turkish midfielder played his second game in four days after making his debut against Deportivo La Coruna in midweek, and he capped off a good display with a well-taken goal in the 5-0 romp.

 

"I'm very happy, but I'm still not totally ready," Emre told nufc.co.uk.

 

"I've only played two games, but I think when I get another couple of games I will be fit.

 

"I tired a bit near the end of the game, but that is to be expected.

 

"I felt my performance was OK, and the goal was not bad!

 

"Last year in Italy I only got one goal, I know I need to get more goals.

 

"On Wednesday I hit the post, so it was nice to get a goal.

 

"I want to score goals, but I am also happy to set up my team-mates. As long as we win, it doesn't matter who scores!

 

United took time to get going against the non-leaguers, with Craig Moore breaking the deadlock in the closing stages of the first half.

 

But The Magpies stepped up a gear in the closing stages with Emre, James Milner and Shola Ameobi with two in injury-time completed the win.

 

Emre added:"We did well in the second half, we are still not 100 per cent but we will be by the time we play Arsenal.

 

"It was a good performance to get score five goals, but the result doesn't matter.

 

"Today was all about getting the fitness right, and the most important game for us now is Arsenal next weekend."

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Impressed me today, could well turn out to be an excellent signing.

8247[/snapback]

 

well if he does turn out to be as good as he's looked so far he'll be off in the summer wont he?

8260[/snapback]

 

Cheerful bugger aren't you.

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Emre looks as if he may be one of the premireship stars of the season, but he wont....

 

 

 

 

 

 

..... I put him in my fantasy football team :o

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I think Emre looks like a "proper footballer" t me.

 

Of course by that Souness means somebody he can handle and who works hard and tackles back, with ability a secondary concern.

 

With me it means somebody with genuine class, technique, control, vision and intelligence.

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From the Independent:

 

The Maradona of the Bos-porus has made an impressive start in his attempt to become the Turk of the Tyne. Many locals consider it a quantum leap even to head south across their famed river to Gateshead, traditionally Newcastle's poor relation, which with the blink of an eye is making a culture-driven emergence from its neighbour's shadow.

 

Such parochial rivalries might seem trivial to Emre Belozoglu, a native of Istanbul, a city which straddles civilisations, where East meets West. The midfielder's arrival at Newcastle last month as one of only a handful of Muslim players in the Premiership was put into sharp focus as terrorists brought carnage to London.

 

Commendably refusing to shy away from the issue, Emre takes it upon himself to buck the trend by acknowledging the presence of a world beyond the cosseted existence of the average Premier-ship footballer.

 

Through an interpreter, his English still being limited, Emre said: "I'm a Muslim as much as everyone is in my country, and it's good to have beliefs like that. As a Muslim I share the disgust at the attacks in London. I don't condone terrorism, and my thoughts are with those affected."

 

As part of the Turkey team subjected to racist abuse during a European Championship qualifier at Sunderland two years ago, no doubt from the same kind of knuckle-draggers who have targeted Sikh temples in a misguided response to Islamic extremists, Emre is acutely aware that the North-East is not alone in harbouring a minority of right-wing sympathisers. That clearly did not affect his decision to turn down Everton in favour of Tyneside, although a five-year contract worth the thick end of £16 million also helped swing it in Newcastle's favour.

 

He revealed: "No, I didn't have any concerns about racism in coming here. To be honest, the match at Sunderland didn't really enter my thoughts. Racism is something that can happen anywhere around the world.

 

"From what I've seen, I have to say that I really like Newcastle. I'm in the process of moving out of my hotel and into a house, which should help me settle in even more."

 

There is little Emre or anyone else can do regarding the one discomfort he has encountered settling into the North-East: "I'd say the only problem at the moment is the weather," he said. "Back home in Turkey it's about 40 degrees. I don't think it's ever going to quite reach that here, but I'm sure I'll get used to it after a while."

 

The Maradona comparisons arose during his four years in Italy, although they are sheepishly rebuffed: "I'm not sure about that. In my book there's only one Maradona, but it's pretty flattering to be likened to such a great player."

 

Having made all the right noises since a £3.8m move from Internazionale, Emre further endeared himself to supporters with an eye-catching midweek debut as Newcastle bowed out of the Intertoto Cup, something of a culture shock for a player who has been a regular Champions' League performer in a nine-season career.

 

He added: "It was important to get that first game under my belt. From a personal point of view it went well, but it was just a shame we couldn't win.

 

"I've been happy with the way the training has gone. I've been training hard and physically I feel pretty good. I was ready for the game on Wednesday, I needed it.

 

"I'm still not 100 per cent physically but I have another week before the Premiership kicks off," added the 24-year-old, who bears the scar of an operation to rectify a broken hand at the year's outset.

 

That Premiership debut arrives at Arsenal on Sunday, when, along with fellow high-profile summer arrival Scott Parker, he will carry much of the burden of ensuring Newcastle avoid an underwhelming first month that would give the chairman, Freddie Shepherd, reason to add to the man-agerial P45s he is apt to issue before the onset of autumn.

 

For the moment, despite being weakened by the exit from Europe, Graeme Souness's position remains relatively safe. The reputation forged by the Scot during a spell in charge at Galatasaray helped persuade Emre to choose St James' Park, and the Newcastle manager said: "Emre's been talked of as the best-ever player to come out of his country, which is saying something.

 

"I've worked with some wonderful Turkish players during my coaching career, and if Emre's half as good as that then I'll be delighted."

 

As he proved impervious to the hedonistic sophistication of Milan, it seems churlish to enquire whether the bright lights of Newcastle's famed quayside might sidetrack Emre from the task ahead. The response is swift. "Believe me, Milan was like that. And then some."

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As he proved impervious to the hedonistic sophistication of Milan, it seems churlish to enquire whether the bright lights of Newcastle's famed quayside might sidetrack Emre from the task ahead. The response is swift. "Believe me, Milan was like that. And then some."

 

 

good !! finally some talent that is NON bling orientated.

 

Maybe he can rub off on dyer lol fat chance (

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From the Independent:

 

The Maradona of the Bos-porus has made an impressive start in his attempt to become the Turk of the Tyne. Many locals consider it a quantum leap even to head south across their famed river to Gateshead, traditionally Newcastle's poor relation, which with the blink of an eye is making a culture-driven emergence from its neighbour's shadow.

 

Such parochial rivalries might seem trivial to Emre Belozoglu, a native of Istanbul, a city which straddles civilisations, where East meets West. The midfielder's arrival at Newcastle last month as one of only a handful of Muslim players in the Premiership was put into sharp focus as terrorists brought carnage to London.

 

Commendably refusing to shy away from the issue, Emre takes it upon himself to buck the trend by acknowledging the presence of a world beyond the cosseted existence of the average Premier-ship footballer.

 

Through an interpreter, his English still being limited, Emre said: "I'm a Muslim as much as everyone is in my country, and it's good to have beliefs like that. As a Muslim I share the disgust at the attacks in London. I don't condone terrorism, and my thoughts are with those affected."

 

As part of the Turkey team subjected to racist abuse during a European Championship qualifier at Sunderland two years ago, no doubt from the same kind of knuckle-draggers who have targeted Sikh temples in a misguided response to Islamic extremists, Emre is acutely aware that the North-East is not alone in harbouring a minority of right-wing sympathisers. That clearly did not affect his decision to turn down Everton in favour of Tyneside, although a five-year contract worth the thick end of £16 million also helped swing it in Newcastle's favour.

 

He revealed: "No, I didn't have any concerns about racism in coming here. To be honest, the match at Sunderland didn't really enter my thoughts. Racism is something that can happen anywhere around the world.

 

"From what I've seen, I have to say that I really like Newcastle. I'm in the process of moving out of my hotel and into a house, which should help me settle in even more."

 

There is little Emre or anyone else can do regarding the one discomfort he has encountered settling into the North-East: "I'd say the only problem at the moment is the weather," he said. "Back home in Turkey it's about 40 degrees. I don't think it's ever going to quite reach that here, but I'm sure I'll get used to it after a while."

 

The Maradona comparisons arose during his four years in Italy, although they are sheepishly rebuffed: "I'm not sure about that. In my book there's only one Maradona, but it's pretty flattering to be likened to such a great player."

 

Having made all the right noises since a £3.8m move from Internazionale, Emre further endeared himself to supporters with an eye-catching midweek debut as Newcastle bowed out of the Intertoto Cup, something of a culture shock for a player who has been a regular Champions' League performer in a nine-season career.

 

He added: "It was important to get that first game under my belt. From a personal point of view it went well, but it was just a shame we couldn't win.

 

"I've been happy with the way the training has gone. I've been training hard and physically I feel pretty good. I was ready for the game on Wednesday, I needed it.

 

"I'm still not 100 per cent physically but I have another week before the Premiership kicks off," added the 24-year-old, who bears the scar of an operation to rectify a broken hand at the year's outset.

 

That Premiership debut arrives at Arsenal on Sunday, when, along with fellow high-profile summer arrival Scott Parker, he will carry much of the burden of ensuring Newcastle avoid an underwhelming first month that would give the chairman, Freddie Shepherd, reason to add to the man-agerial P45s he is apt to issue before the onset of autumn.

 

For the moment, despite being weakened by the exit from Europe, Graeme Souness's position remains relatively safe. The reputation forged by the Scot during a spell in charge at Galatasaray helped persuade Emre to choose St James' Park, and the Newcastle manager said: "Emre's been talked of as the best-ever player to come out of his country, which is saying something.

 

"I've worked with some wonderful Turkish players during my coaching career, and if Emre's half as good as that then I'll be delighted."

 

As he proved impervious to the hedonistic sophistication of Milan, it seems churlish to enquire whether the bright lights of Newcastle's famed quayside might sidetrack Emre from the task ahead. The response is swift. "Believe me, Milan was like that. And then some."

8341[/snapback]

 

Everton isn't that in Liverpool where they commit racist murders. I hate f*ckwits like this. Sunderland has a large BNP presence. Newcastle doesn't. Arsehole journalists.

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