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Nominations...

 

Best picture

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Frost/Nixon

Milk

The Reader

Slumdog Millionaire

 

 

Best director

Danny Boyle - Slumdog Millionaire

Stephen Daldry - The Reader

David Fincher - The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Ron Howard - Frost/Nixon

Gus Van Sant - Milk

 

 

Best actor

Richard Jenkins - The Visitor

Frank Langella - Frost/Nixon

Sean Penn - Milk

Brad Pitt - The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Mickey Rourke - The Wrestler

 

Best actress

Anne Hathaway - Rachel Getting Married

Angelina Jolie - Changeling

Melissa Leo - Frozen River

Meryl Streep - Doubt

Kate Winslet - The Reader

 

Best supporting actress

Amy Adams - Doubt

Penelope Cruz - Vicky Cristina Barcelona

Viola Davis - Doubt

Taraji P Henson - The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Marisa Tomei - The Wrestler

 

Best supporting actor

Josh Brolin - Milk

Robert Downey Jr - Tropic Thunder

Philip Seymour Hoffman - Doubt

Heath Ledger - The Dark Knight

Michael Shannon - Revolutionary Road

 

Best foreign language film

Revanche - Austria

The Class - France

The Baader Meinhof Complex - Germany

Departures - Japan

Waltz With Bashir - Israel

 

Best animated feature film

Bolt

Kung Fu Panda

Wall-E

 

 

Best adapted screenplay

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Doubt

Frost/Nixon

The Reader

Slumdog Millionaire

 

 

Best original screenplay

Happy-Go-Lucky

Milk

Wall-E

In Bruges

Frozen River

Edited by Happy Face

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Based on what I have seen and what interests me, id go with:

 

 

Best picture

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

 

 

Best director

Danny Boyle - Slumdog Millionaire

 

 

Best actor

Brad Pitt - The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

 

 

Best supporting actor

Heath Ledger - The Dark Knight

 

 

Best animated feature film

Wall-E

 

 

Best adapted screenplay

Slumdog Millionaire

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The rest of the list...

Best original score

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Defiance

Milk

Slumdog Millionaire

Wall-E

 

 

Best original song

Down To Earth - Wall-E

Jai Ho - Slumdog Millionaire

O Saya - Slumdog Millionaire

 

 

Art direction

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Changeling

The Dark Knight

The Duchess

Revolutionary Road

 

 

Cinematography

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Changeling

The Dark Knight

Slumdog Millionaire

The Reader

 

 

Costume design

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Australia

Milk

The Duchess

Revolutionary Road

 

 

Best documentary feature

The Betrayal

Encounters at the End of the World

The Garden

Man on Wire

Trouble The Water

 

 

Best documentary short subject

The Conscience of Nhem En

The Final Inch

Smile Pinki

The Witness - From the Balcony of Room 306

 

 

Film editing

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

The Dark Knight

Frost/Nixon

Milk

Slumdog Millionaire

 

 

Make-up

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

The Dark Knight

Hellboy II: The Golden Army

 

 

Best live action short film

Auf der Strecke (On The Line)

Manon on the Asphalt

New Boy

The Pig

Spielzeugland (Toyland)

 

 

Best animated short film

La Maison en Petits Cubes

Lavatory - Lovestory

Oktapodi

Presto

This Way Up

 

 

Sound editing

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Iron Man

Wanted

Slumdog Millionaire

Wall-E

 

 

Sound mixing

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

The Dark Knight

Wanted

Slumdog Millionaire

Wall-E

 

 

Visual effects

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

The Dark Knight

Iron Man

 

Totals...

 

The Curious Case of Benjamin Buttton - 13

Slumdog Millionaire - 10

The Dark Knight - 8

Milk - 8

Wall-E - 6

Doubt - 5

Frost/Nixon - 5

The Reader - 5

Changeling - 3

Revolutionary Road - 3

 

I've only seen the bold two and neither lived up to the hype.

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The Curious Case of Benjamin Buttton - 13

Slumdog Millionaire - 10

The Dark Knight - 8

Milk - 8

Wall-E - 6

Doubt - 5

Frost/Nixon - 5

The Reader - 5

Changeling - 3

Revolutionary Road - 3

 

I've only seen the bold two and neither lived up to the hype.

 

Not like you Happy, thought you would of had most of those wrapped up by now ;)

 

TDK's score is immense btw, so hopefully it wins.

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Not like you Happy, thought you would of had most of those wrapped up by now ;)

 

I'm generally about a year behind on most Hollywood fare.

 

I'm not a film geek fan boy, I just like babbling on about what I have seen.

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I really hope Ledger wins. 

 

Do you? Why?

If Ledger hadn't topped himself it would of just gone down as another ok support role in another comic book film.

But a couple of uppers, downers and bit of coke later and he's guaranteed to win anything he's nominated in.

Award on merit, not because the clowns eyeliner ran.

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'Why Slumdog fails to move me'

 

Slumdog Millionaire, Danny Boyle's new film based on a rags-to-riches tale of an Indian slum boy, has already become one of the hits of the year. The BBC's Soutik Biswas wonders whether it is really the "masterpiece" it is made out to be.

 

_45401035_slumposterap466.jpg

The film has been called a Dickensian take on the city of Mumbai

 

Like his protagonist, a gutsy 18-year-old slum boy who is on the verge of winning 20 million rupees (about $400,000) in a popular TV quiz show, Danny Boyle has hit an unlikely jackpot with Slumdog Millionaire.

 

And much like Jamal, a child who nobody believes could get this far on the TV show without cheating, Boyle is being roasted by some critics for taking an easy shortcut and "using" poverty to serve up a we-are-poor-but-we-are-happy story.

 

After picking up four US Golden Globe awards and raking in nearly $50m at the box office in the US and Britain already, Slumdog, unquestionably, is the flavour of the season.

 

With its mixed cast, the much-feted and hyped film is also Boyle's paean to Mumbai (Bombay), India's edgy metropolis of extremes, and Bollywood, the world's most prolific film industry.

 

 

Everybody loves a good underdog. That is why Slumdog touches a chord

 

Send your comments on Soutik Biswas's review

 

Some have called it a moving Dickensian take on Mumbai thanks to its portrayal of the city's stifling and colourful squalor and the people who live in it. Others have derisively called it poverty porn. One critic called Boyle's work "slum chic".

 

Well, yes, in the shadow of rubbish mountains, mothers get hacked to death in front of their children in religious rioting and a movie star-struck slum boy defecating under the open sky falls into a slush of excreta. Children get their eyes burnt with acid, and girls are forced into brothels by rakish young men.

 

_45401038_dharavislumap226.jpg

Slumdog is based in Mumbai's teeming slums

 

On the eve of the film's release in India, NGOs invite reporters to meet the "real slumdogs". "Off the back of Slumdog Millionaire," says one invitation in my inbox, "we can offer access to the slums of Delhi and interview opportunities with the real 'slumdogs' - children who live in absolute poverty every day."

 

Poverty, like a lot of things, is good business in a free market. But India is also exceedingly cruel to its poor and callous towards its children, and is one of the most unequal societies in the world.

 

I have no issues with Boyle's cheery depiction of the resilience of slum children and the sunny side of slum life: it is part of the unchanging popular oriental stereotype of poverty equals slums equals dirty, smiling children. Been there, seen that.

 

In fact, Indians appear to have come to terms with Western filmmakers' depiction of the country's crushing poverty.

 

I remember the sets - a vast slum, what else? - of Roland Joffe's multi-million dollar City of Joy, starring Patrick Swayze, being firebombed by arsonists in the city of Calcutta in the early 1990s. They charged him with selling poverty. Joffe had to pack up his bags, leave the city and finish the film at London's Pinewood studios.

 

My quibble with Slumdog Millionaire lies elsewhere. The film doesn't move me.

 

I suspect what Boyle tries to do is a Bollywood film - the dirt-poor lost brothers, unrequited love - with dollops of gritty realism. But at the end of it all, it is a pretty callow copy of a genre which only the Indians can make with the élan it deserves.

 

The realism skims the surface, and in spite of some decent performances, style dominates over substance. And the film does not grip me in the way, say, the story of the life in Rio de Janeiro's favelas in the 2002 Brazilian crime drama City of Gods did.

 

_45401043_boyleafp226.jpg

Boyle 'tries to do a Bollywood' film for the West

 

Slumdog is a fast-moving visual feast, thanks to some kinetic cinematography and nifty editing. It's kitschy, but again not kitschy enough, to stand up to Bollywood. The closing dance sequence at a railway station looks like an aerobics master class. The soundtrack is a noisy pastiche of rap, hip hop and funk Bollywood. AR Rahman fully deserves his Globe - if the film can deserve so many - but Slumdog is obviously not his greatest soundtrack.

 

Ignorance

 

Everybody loves a good underdog. That is why Slumdog strikes a chord with audiences in these depressing times. But a clever telling of the story cannot hide the banality of it.

 

Slumdog proves - like many films - that globalisation has largely failed to make cultures understand each other better. Because Indian cinema is synonymous with feckless Bollywood fare to many in the West, a vast body of critically acclaimed and often, popular, work which has consistently exposed India's underbelly with more ferocity and vigour than any foreign film is routinely ignored.

 

Remember Satyajit Ray, India's only Oscar-winning filmmaker - derided in his own country as a pedlar of poverty - and his early work based in famished Indian villages? Remember Ritwik Ghatak's gut-wrenching portrayals of the horrors of post-partition India in the shantytowns of Calcutta? More recently, a slew of bright, young Indian filmmakers have taken on themes which expose India's many mutinies and fault lines.

 

The lesson from Slumdog Millionaire is: the 'Bollywood' genre firmly belongs to India and no other, and nobody can do it better.

 

And if you are looking for gritty realism set in the badlands of Mumbai, order a DVD of a film called Satya by Ramgopal Verma. The 1998 feature on an immigrant who is sucked into Mumbai's colourful underworld makes Slumdog look like a slick, uplifting MTV docu-drama.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/7843960.stm

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Totally underwhelmed by The Wrestler and Micky Rourke was good but nothing special. Mind you as Aronofsky kept filming him from behind I don't see how you can really judge. Glad he's not up for best director.

Not seen any of the other nominated films although I might watch Button this weekend.

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Apparently its a good story/film. If you go to a film to enjoy it for what it is, entertainment rather than the basis for a phd, he would probably enjoy it more

 

firstly. i've not seen the film. you've not seen the film. so i think it's unfair to criticise the piece untill you have seen what he's talking about.

 

plus the reviewer isn't demanding any intellectual satisfaction from the film, as you are suggesting, he just wants authenticity. and he's expressing that through the article. what's wrong with that?

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Why is every film nominated for an Oscar usually the ones that I have no interest in seeing whatsoever. Thr trailers for all of those look gash

 

 

maybe because they appeal to those with taste & sophistication? :(:rolleyes:

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Just finished watching Milk - wouldnt surprise me if this gets most oscars tbh.

 

Are you saying all the Hollywood types that vote are gayers?

:(

Edited by Happy Face

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Total Nominations

9 - Avatar, The Hurt Locker

8 - Inglourious Basterds

6 - Precious, Up In the Air

5 - Up

4 - Dictrict 9, Nine, Star Trek

3 - An Education, Crazy Heart, The Princess and the Frog, Queen Victoria

 

BEST PICTURE

Avatar

District 9

An Education

The Hurt Locker

Inglourious Basterds

Precious

A Serious Man

Up

Up in the Air

 

BEST DIRECTOR

James Cameron (Avatar)

Kathryn Bigelow (The Hurt Locker)

Quentin Tarantino (Inglourious Basterds)

Lee Daniels (Precious)

Jason Reitman (Up in the Air)

 

 

BEST ACTOR

Jeff Bridges (Crazy Heart)

George Clooney (Up in the Air)

Colin Firth (A Single Man)

Morgan Freeman (Invictus)

Jeremy Renner (The Hurt Locker)

 

 

ACTRESS

Sandra Bullock (The Blind Side)

Helen Mirren (The Last Station)

Carey Mulligan (An Education)

Gabourey Sidibe (Precious)

Meryl Streep (Julie and Julia)

 

 

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Matt Damon (Invictus)

Woody Harrelson (The Messenger)

Christopher Plummer (The Last Station)

Stanley Tucci (The Lovely Bones)

Christoph Waltz (Inglourious Basterds)

 

 

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Penelope Cruz (Nine)

Vera Farmiga (Up in the Air)

Maggie Gyllenhaal (Crazy Heart)

Anna Kendrick (Up in the Air)

Mo'Nique (Precious)

 

 

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

Ajami (Israel)

El Secreto de Sus Ojos - The Secret of Their Eyes (Argentina)

The Milk of Sorrow (Peru)

France (Un Prophete - A Prophet)

Germany (The White Ribbon)

 

 

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Mark Boal (The Hurt Locker)

Quentin Tarantino, (Inglourious Basterds)

Alessandro Camon and Oren Moverman (The Messenger)

Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (A Serious Man)

Bob Peterson, Pete Docter, Tom McCarthy (Up)

 

 

BEST ANIMATION

Coraline

Fantastic Mr Fox

The Princess and the Frog

The Secret of Kells

Up

 

 

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

Neill Blomkamp and Terri Tatchell (District 9)

Nick Hornby (An Education)

Jesse Armstrong, Simon Blackwell, Armando Iannucci, Tony Roche (In the Loop)

Geoffrey Fletcher (Precious: based on the novel Push by Sapphire)

Jason Reitman and Sheldon Turner (Up in the Air)

 

 

BEST ART DIRECTION

Avatar

The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus

Nine

Sherlock Holmes

The Young Victoria

 

 

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Avatar

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince

The Hurt Locker

Inglourious Basterds

The White Ribbon

 

 

BEST SOUND MIXING

Avatar

The Hurt Locker

Inglourious Basterds

Star Trek

Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen

 

 

BEST SOUND EDITING

Avatar

The Hurt Locker

Inglourious Basterds

Star Trek

Up

 

 

BEST ORIGINAL SONG

Almost There from The Princess and the Frog by Randy Newman

Down in New Orleans from The Princess and the Frog by Randy Newman

Loin de Paname from Paris 36 by Reinhardt Wagner and Frank Thomas

Take It All from Nine by Maury Yeston

The Weary Kind (theme from Crazy Heart) from Crazy Heart by Ryan Bingham and T Bone Burnett

 

 

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE

Avatar (James Horner)

Fantastic Mr Fox (Alexandre Desplat)

The Hurt Locker (Marco Beltrami and Buck Sanders)

Sherlock Holmes (Hans Zimmer)

Up (Michael Giacchino)

 

 

BEST COSTUMES

Bright Star

Coco Before Chanel

The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus

Nine

The Young Victoria

 

 

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

Burma VJ

The Cove

Food, Inc.

The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers

Which Way Home

 

 

BEST DOCUMENTARY SHORT

China's Unnatural Disaster: The Tears of Sichuan Province

The Last Campaign of Governor Booth Gardner

The Last Truck: Closing of a GM Plant

Music by Prudence

Rabbit a la Berlin

 

 

BEST FILM EDITING

Avatar

District 9

The Hurt Locker

Inglourious Basterds

Precious

 

 

BEST MAKE-UP

Il Divo

Star Trek

The Young Victoria

 

 

BEST ANIMATED SHORT FILM

French Roast

Granny O'Grimm's Sleeping Beauty

The Lady and the Reaper (La Dama y la Muerte)

Logorama

A Matter of Loaf and Death

 

 

BEST LIVE ACTION SHORT FILMThe Door

Instead of Abracadabra

Kavi

Miracle Fish

The New Tenants

 

 

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS

Avatar

District 9

Star Trek

 

Can't believe Inglourious Basterds got all those. It was shit.

 

I thought the visual effects on Where the Wild Things Go were better than any of the big explosiony films.

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I thought the visual effects on Where the Wild Things Go were better than any of the big explosiony films.

 

So did I. In fact, the whole film had a very pleasing charm to it, very strong voice acting and was a very good take on the book. It was quite underrated in the grand scheme of things last year, sadly.

 

I probably liked District 9 and Up the most out of all of those Best Picture nominations. Saying that, I've not seen A Serious Man or Up in The Air yet.

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I thought the visual effects on Where the Wild Things Go were better than any of the big explosiony films.

 

So did I. In fact, the whole film had a very pleasing charm to it, very strong voice acting and was a very good take on the book. It was quite underrated in the grand scheme of things last year, sadly.

 

I probably liked District 9 and Up the most out of all of those Best Picture nominations. Saying that, I've not seen A Serious Man or Up in The Air yet.

 

The visual effects award (and all the nominations) seem to be given to the film with most computer graphics (not even the best). I was similarly pissed when Eternal Sunshine didn't even get nominated and I, Robot did, despite it's baddies looking superimposed on the screen like Roger Rabbit, but moving less realistically.

 

Nice to see Nick Hornby nominated.

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Some odd choices for Best Picture.

 

Inglorious - I enjoyed it, but seriously?!

 

The Hurt Locker - The praise this film has got recently has been bonkers. I really enjoyed it, but it's just a solid war film with the same old cliches (a maverick who doesn't play by the rules, inept British soldiers) that happens to be set in Iraq.

 

 

I hated WWTA btw. All its critical and commercial success stemmed from Guardian reading Florence and the Machine listening ponces wetting themselves over a clever and talky take on a classic childrens book. Very melancholy and a million miles from the theme of the book. Both my girlfriend and I found it very sad and as I saw it just after New Years it combined with the post christmas blues and my job applications to nearly push me into full blown depression. Dire.

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Why the Oscars are a con

 

Why are so many films so bad? This year's Oscar nominations are a parade of propaganda, stereotypes and downright dishonesty. The dominant theme is as old as Hollywood: America's divine right to invade other societies, steal their history and occupy our memory. When will directors and writers behave like artists and not pimps for a world-view devoted to control and destruction?

 

I grew up on the movie myth of the Wild West, which was harmless enough unless you happened to be a Native American. The formula is unchanged. Self-regarding distortions present the nobility of the American colonial aggressor as a cover for massacre, from the Philippines to Iraq. I only fully understood the power of the con when I was sent to Vietnam as a war reporter. The Vietnamese were "gooks" and "Indians", whose industrial murder was preordained in John Wayne movies and left to Hollywood to glamourise or redeem.

 

I use the word murder advisedly, because what Hollywood does brilliantly is suppress the truth about America's assaults. These are not wars, but the export of a gun-addicted, homicidal "culture". And when the notion of psychopaths as heroes wears thin, the bloodbath becomes an "American tragedy" with a soundtrack of pure angst.

 

American airbrush

Kathryn Bigelow's The Hurt Locker is in this tradition. A favourite for multiple Oscars, her film is "better than any documentary I've seen on the Iraq war. It's so real it's scary" (Paul Chambers, CNN). Peter Bradshaw in the Guardian reckons it has "unpretentious clarity" and is "about the long and painful endgame in Iraq", and that it "says more about the agony and wrong and tragedy of war than all those earnest well-meaning movies".

 

What nonsense. This film offers a vicarious thrill through yet another standard-issue psychopath, high on violence in somebody else's country where the deaths of a million people are consigned to cinematic oblivion. The hype around Bigelow is that she may be the first woman to win the Oscar for Best Director. How insulting that a woman is celebrated for a typically violent all-male war movie.

 

The accolades echo those for The Deer Hunter (1978), which critics acclaimed as "the film that could purge a nation's guilt"! The Deer Hunter lauded those who had caused the deaths of more than three million Vietnamese, while reducing those who resisted to barbaric commie stick figures. In 2001, Ridley Scott's Black Hawk Down provided a similar, if less subtle, catharsis for another "noble failure" by the US, this time in Somalia, airbrushing the heroes' massacre of up to 10,000 Somalis.

 

By contrast, the fate of an admirable American war film, Redacted, is instructive. Made in 2007 by Brian De Palma, the film is based on the true story of the gang rape of an Iraqi teenager and the murder of her family by US soldiers. There is no heroism, no purgative. The murderers are murderers, and De Palma ingeniously describes the complicity of Hollywood and the media in the epic crime of Iraq. The film ends with a series of photographs of Iraqi civilians who were killed. When it was ordered that their faces be blacked out "for legal reasons", De Palma said: "I think that's terrible because now we have not even given the dignity of faces to this suffering people. The great irony about Redacted is that it was redacted." After a limited release in the US, the film all but vanished.

 

Non-American (or non-western) humanity is not deemed to have box-office appeal, dead or alive. They are the "other" who are allowed, at best, to be saved by "us". In Avatar, James Cameron's vast and violent money-printer, 3-D noble savages known as the Na'vi need a good-guy American soldier, Sergeant Jake Sully, to save them. This confirms they are "good". Natch.

 

My Oscar for the worst of this year's nominees goes to Invictus, Clint Eastwood's unctuous insult to the struggle against apartheid in South Africa. Based on a hagiography of Mandela by a British journalist, John Carlin, the film might have been a product of apartheid propaganda. In promoting the racist, thuggish rugby culture as a panacea of the "rainbow nation", Eastwood gives barely a hint that many black South Africans were deeply embarrassed and hurt by Mandela's embrace of the hated springbok symbol of their suffering. He airbrushes white violence - but not black violence, which is ever present as a threat. As for the Boer racists, they have hearts of gold, because they "didn't really know". The subliminal theme is all too familiar: colonialism deserves forgiveness and accommodation, never justice.

 

Sheer realism

At first I thought Invictus could not be taken seriously, but then I looked around the cinema at young people and others for whom the horrors of apartheid have no reference, and I understood the damage such a slick travesty does to our memory and its moral lessons. Imagine Eastwood making a happy-Sambo equivalent in America's Deep South. He would not dare.

 

The film most nominated for an Oscar and promoted by the critics is Up in the Air, which stars George Clooney as a man who travels the US sacking people and collecting frequent-flyer points. Before the triteness dissolves into sentimentality, every stereotype is summoned, especially of women. There is a bitch, a saint and a cheat. However, this is "a movie for our times", says the director, Jason Reitman, who boasts about having cast real sacked people.

 

“We interviewed them about what it was like to lose their job in this economy," said he, "then we'd fire them on camera and ask them to respond the way they did when they lost their job . . . It was an incredible experience to watch these non-actors with 100 per cent realism." Wow, what a winner.

 

http://www.newstatesman.com/film/2010/02/p...ar-american-war

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