Jump to content

Right for the job?


Christmas Tree
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 56
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Thee T ith theriouth you guyth. Cath-wordth.

 

No, it won't rub off mate. A lithp ith wiwwy not thomething you thimply pick up!

 

A lisp is a speech development issue picked up by young children as they learn to speak. You have an accent because you are hearing words from those around you said in a certain way. Therefore if a child hears an adult say "theriouth", how does the child realise its an error and not pronounce it that way.

 

Im not taking the pith btw.

Edited by Christmas Tree
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe if everyody the kid spoke to ever had a lisp, then maybe they'd speak that way, see Spanish, or Ethpanyol.

 

but no, not one person at a nursery, you doyle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll ask my lass, CT if you like - she's studying speech therapy and has had several placements working with little'uns with speech disorders/difficulties.

 

Aye that would be canny. Im sure the answer will be its ok as the nursery wouldnt employ her but still nice to know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think its a fairly honest question.

 

If your child was in a nursery being spoken and read too by a scottish person then it would be only normal that they may pick up some scottish twang.

 

:lol:

 

"Ma, get me some fucking Iron Bru now!"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Should somebody with a lisp be allowed to work as a nursery nurse?

 

Can it rub off?

That's like saying should someone with a Pakistani accent be allowed to be a nursery nurse for fear of kids sounding like they run a corner shop at 8 and 9 years of age.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think its a fairly honest question.

 

If your child was in a nursery being spoken and read too by a scottish person then it would be only normal that they may pick up some scottish twang.

 

The problem is that the question has very shaky ground as it's foundations. The child would have to hear lisped words and only lisped words to think that it was the "correct" way to pronounce. I can't believe you needed someone else to tell you that

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

The problem is that the question has very shaky ground as it's foundations. The child would have to hear lisped words and only lisped words to think that it was the "correct" way to pronounce. I can't believe you needed someone else to tell you that

 

But a child with Lispy 5 days a week is going to hear more of her pronunciation than her own parents (not that he's there that long).

 

The fact that you think this is so open and shut, surprises me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.