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OWEN: WHATEVER I SAY IS TWISTED


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OWEN: WHATEVER I SAY IS TWISTED

 

 

 

SUDDENLY I am being portrayed as a football rebel — someone who wants to take on the world in general and Sam Allardyce in particular.

 

Nothing could be further from the truth.

 

I can honestly say, hand on heart, I have never, ever set out to cause a single problem for any of my managers. And I'm sure I've succeeded in that aim.

 

But over the last few weeks, I have been misrepresented in a way that has made me feel very frustrated and, at times, angry.

 

It all stemmed from my recent double stomach operation in Germany which enabled me to be fit and ready for action again in eight days.

 

Now you might have thought that was a cause for celebration, having worked hard to recover in record time.

 

It was certainly a positive episode as far as I was concerned but it soon became a massive negative with accusations that I had rushed back too soon so I could play in the England games against Estonia and Russia.

 

The spin was put on it that I was more concerned about playing for my country than my club.

 

As a result of that people have tried to drive a wedge between myself and Sam Allardyce.

 

I was even told about one headline which quoted me as saying "Shut It Sam". If you look at my actual comments I did not use the words "shut", or "it" or "Sam".

 

Someone with a very vivid imagination dreamed that one up.

 

Let me now try to clarify the situation.

 

I recognise that my club manager wants me to be fit and available for every game for Newcastle. And, believe it or not, so do I.

 

What I must also point out, though, is that I am fortunate enough to play for two teams — England and Newcastle.

 

And as long as I am fit, I will try my hardest to play well and score goals for both.

 

It was in Sport of the World two weeks ago that I stated quite clearly that my priority after the two operations lay with Newcastle.

 

I explained that my original comeback target was to play against Spurs, in the game immediately after the international break.

 

And that anything ahead of that would be a bonus.

 

In fact, it was Sam Allardyce who first raised the possibility of me being fit for the game against Everton after he had spoken to the surgeon who carried out my operations.

 

As it turned out, I was fit for that game — albeit as a substitute — but it was never a case of me rushing back for Newcastle just so I could join up with England.

 

You can imagine how I felt then when I was warming up before the Everton game to hear one Newcastle fan shout at me: "Come on Owen, it's about time you put us before England."

 

That hurt me almost as much as pushing myself through the pain barrier in the days immediately after my surgery.

 

No one but me knows what that involved.

 

And, it seems, no one wants to believe I was doing it for both my club AND my country.

 

I have missed far too much football in recent seasons to be able to afford to pick and choose which matches I want to play in.

 

I will repeat: I want to play in EVERY game, whether it is for Newcastle or England.

 

A footballer's career is short enough as it is without deliberately missing out on big matches.

 

But sometimes I cannot win. I have had games for England when I haven't done particularly well and suddenly I am labelled a bad player.

 

Then, if I score a few goals for the national team, as I did against Russia at home and away in Estonia last season, I'm accused of putting my country before my club.

 

It's a good job I am a fairly level-headed person or it would drive me mad.

 

But I have been in the game long enough to know how things can just spiral out of control. While I was away with England last week, there were comments about release clauses in my contract, how I needed to prove myself at Newcastle and even my team-mate Joey Barton was dragged into the debate.

 

He said he wanted to get fit again for Newcastle before considering a recall for England — and that was perceived as an attack on me.

 

I will ignore all that for now and get on with my job.

 

I suppose I should be used to all this.

 

It happened to me before when I was a Liverpool player.

 

I broke into the England team and did well internationally almost before I had properly established myself at Anfield.

 

The Reds fans didn't like that because they thought I was only interested in my international career.

 

But I did manage to turn them around by scoring loads of goals in helping Liverpool to win an unprecedented cup treble in 2001.

 

For the first time the fans started chanting my name on a regular basis and I was referred to as "Liverpool's Michael Owen" rather than "the England striker Michael Owen".

 

I guess that is the way to win over public opinion at Newcastle as well.

 

If I can score the goals that will help them win a trophy or two, that will prove how much I am committed to the club.

 

I would love to do just that. But at the same time, I want to help England to win something as well.

 

And I still reckon it is possible to enjoy the best of both of those worlds.

 

Interview: DAVID HARRISON

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What I must also point out, though, is that I am fortunate enough to play for two teams — England and Newcastle.

 

You play for one team. That is Newcastle United. The ones who are paying your exorbitant wages.

 

Anything besides that is a bonus and it is time you started treating it that way.

Edited by acrossthepond
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Guest Patrokles

What I must also point out, though, is that I am fortunate enough to play for two teams — England and Newcastle.

 

You play for one team. That is Newcastle United. The ones who are paying your exorbitant wages.

 

Anything besides that is a bonus and it is time you started treating it that way.

 

I'm fairly sure he plays for England too. I'll have to double-check but I'm almost certain.

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What I must also point out, though, is that I am fortunate enough to play for two teams — England and Newcastle.

 

You play for one team. That is Newcastle United. The ones who are paying your exorbitant wages.

 

Anything besides that is a bonus and it is time you started treating it that way.

 

Oh for fucks sake. Please go away.

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OWEN: WHATEVER I SAY IS TWISTED

.

 

 

What I must also point out, though, is that I am fortunate enough to play for two teams — England and Newcastle.

:razz:

 

putting england first again, scumbag

 

 

 

 

 

B)

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What I must also point out, though, is that I am fortunate enough to play for two teams — England and Newcastle.

 

You play for one team. That is Newcastle United. The ones who are paying your exorbitant wages.

 

Anything besides that is a bonus and it is time you started treating it that way.

 

It's tits like you that he's aiming the title of his article at....

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Don't be harsh on these lads, I translated on N-O what they tend to read and I think it will show you why they react how they do:

 

OWEN: WHATEVER I SAY IS TWISTED

 

I am a football rebel — someone who wants to take on the world in general and Sam Allardyce in particular.

 

I can honestly say, hand on heart, I have set out to cause a problem for all of my managers. And I'm sure I've succeeded in that aim.

 

It all stemmed from my recent double stomach operation in Germany which enabled me to be fit and ready for action again in eight days.

 

Now you might have thought that was a cause for celebration, having worked hard to recover in record time.

 

It was certainly a positive episode as far as I was concerned I could play in the England games against Estonia and Russia.

 

I was more concerned about playing for my country than my club.

 

"Shut It Sam"

 

I explained that my original comeback target was to play the international.

 

And that anything ahead of that would be a bonus.

 

In fact, it was Sam Allardyce who first raised the possibility of me being fit for the game against Everton after he had spoken to the surgeon who carried out my operations.

 

As it turned out, I was fit for that game — albeit as a substitute — but it was a case of me rushing back for Newcastle just so I could join up with England.

 

And, it seems, I was doing it for my country.

 

I have missed far too much football in recent seasons to be able to afford to pick and choose which matches I want to play in.

 

I will repeat: I want to play in EVERY game, for England.

 

A footballer's career is short enough as it is without deliberately missing out on big matches.

 

I want to help England to win something.

 

And I still reckon it is possible.

Interview: DAVID HARRISON

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Guest James_coDurham
Don't be harsh on these lads, I translated on N-O what they tend to read and I think it will show you why they react how they do:

 

OWEN: WHATEVER I SAY IS TWISTED

 

I am a football rebel — someone who wants to take on the world in general and Sam Allardyce in particular.

 

I can honestly say, hand on heart, I have set out to cause a problem for all of my managers. And I'm sure I've succeeded in that aim.

 

It all stemmed from my recent double stomach operation in Germany which enabled me to be fit and ready for action again in eight days.

 

Now you might have thought that was a cause for celebration, having worked hard to recover in record time.

 

It was certainly a positive episode as far as I was concerned I could play in the England games against Estonia and Russia.

 

I was more concerned about playing for my country than my club.

 

"Shut It Sam"

 

I explained that my original comeback target was to play the international.

 

And that anything ahead of that would be a bonus.

 

In fact, it was Sam Allardyce who first raised the possibility of me being fit for the game against Everton after he had spoken to the surgeon who carried out my operations.

 

As it turned out, I was fit for that game — albeit as a substitute — but it was a case of me rushing back for Newcastle just so I could join up with England.

 

And, it seems, I was doing it for my country.

 

I have missed far too much football in recent seasons to be able to afford to pick and choose which matches I want to play in.

 

I will repeat: I want to play in EVERY game, for England.

 

A footballer's career is short enough as it is without deliberately missing out on big matches.

 

I want to help England to win something.

 

And I still reckon it is possible.

Interview: DAVID HARRISON

 

You sad bastard :razz:

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Guest James_coDurham
Ironic coming from the kid who has decided to spend his morning winding certain people up.

 

Bet you have spent more time looking for our posts and coming up with your amazingly funny replies than I did deleting a few lines from an article.

 

:razz: Sad bastard!!!

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Don't be harsh on these lads, I translated on N-O what they tend to read and I think it will show you why they react how they do:

 

OWEN: WHATEVER I SAY IS TWISTED

 

I am a football rebel — someone who wants to take on the world in general and Sam Allardyce in particular.

 

I can honestly say, hand on heart, I have set out to cause a problem for all of my managers. And I'm sure I've succeeded in that aim.

 

It all stemmed from my recent double stomach operation in Germany which enabled me to be fit and ready for action again in eight days.

 

Now you might have thought that was a cause for celebration, having worked hard to recover in record time.

 

It was certainly a positive episode as far as I was concerned I could play in the England games against Estonia and Russia.

 

I was more concerned about playing for my country than my club.

 

"Shut It Sam"

 

I explained that my original comeback target was to play the international.

 

And that anything ahead of that would be a bonus.

 

In fact, it was Sam Allardyce who first raised the possibility of me being fit for the game against Everton after he had spoken to the surgeon who carried out my operations.

 

As it turned out, I was fit for that game — albeit as a substitute — but it was a case of me rushing back for Newcastle just so I could join up with England.

 

And, it seems, I was doing it for my country.

 

I have missed far too much football in recent seasons to be able to afford to pick and choose which matches I want to play in.

 

I will repeat: I want to play in EVERY game, for England.

 

A footballer's career is short enough as it is without deliberately missing out on big matches.

 

I want to help England to win something.

 

And I still reckon it is possible.

Interview: DAVID HARRISON

 

:razz:

Edited by ewerk
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Owen in finding out 'the media are in it for themselves' shocker!

 

He knows full well what the media are like which is why he never comments until pushed to it by the Sun and stupid cunts like the yank on here. I can't believe he even gets stick for this article, absolutely fucking stupid.

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Owen in finding out 'the media are in it for themselves' shocker!

 

He knows full well what the media are like which is why he never comments until pushed to it by the Sun and stupid cunts like the yank on here. I can't believe he even gets stick for this article, absolutely fucking stupid.

 

Go team!

 

...knob. :razz:

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