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Oh I realise that Renton ;)

Just bored in my lunch break.

 

I'm off now to apply the opposing forces of Gravity and Friction to 14 stone of raw sex ;)

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I know I'm right on this one.

 

Why you think the hose is working against itself and not the atmosphere is a mystery to me.

I don't. The water is working against the hose.

 

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you are happy that the water will move in a vacuum but not the fireman. Could the fireman actually be moving and water not?

I'll try and explain is as best I can.

 

We have to assume a human can be in the vacuum of space.

Give him a medicine ball and tell him to throw that medicine ball away from himself. Once he throws it...that medicine ball flies off into space at whatever speed he threw it and with no resistance, it will continue to do so until acted upon by some other force.

Because he's thrown that medicine ball forward, the spring of his arms have provided the momentum, yet because there is no resistance to that ball, and space wants to swallow it , it creates no opposite reaction to him, so he stays put.

 

 

On Earth, if he threw the same medicine ball whilst stood on ice skates..the weight of the ball , pushing against the atmosphere, plus the downward gravity, would push him back slightly , depending on how much force he put into the throw,

 

A for instance:

Let's say you had a wide sheet of ply wood and you went to hit your mate on the side of the head with it , for some reason but you decided to just slowly swing the board towards him. You would feel a slight resistance against the atmosphere but you would hit him without any problem.

 

Do the same thing but this time take your hardest swing at him and what happens?

Either you will lose control of the board before it hits him, due to the speed you are hitting the atmosphere around you, or by the time it gets to him, the atmosphere has slowed it down to virtually nothing because your body strength wouldn't be enough to overcome the force acting on that board.

 

People are just told that the atmosphere has no effect but it does and it should be obvious..yet people have been taught to think otherwise because they have been amazed by the science and bamboozled by the maths that supposedly back it all up.

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You tell me why, then I'll correct you.

The water is working against the hose because it's hitting the pressure of the atmosphere, propelling it backwards. The only way to stop that, is to have something or a larger force acting against it, which would be the fireman.

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If that's the case, then putting a hose into water would make it stop.

 

Which doesn't happen.

 

Can you see where you're going wrong yet?

The hose is working under pressure due to a pump, so putting it under water will not make it stop, unless it was under sufficient weight of water that nullifies the strength of that pump/pressure.

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Aye, the pump provides the pressure which makes the water seek an escape.

Not the atmosphere/medium it escapes into.

The act of escaping that pressure exerts a force on the hose , which wants to move ,but doesn't move because Sam is holding it.

Do you agree?

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Aye, the pump provides the pressure which makes the water seek an escape.

Not the atmosphere/medium it escapes into.

The act of escaping that pressure exerts a force on the hose , which wants to move ,but doesn't move because Sam is holding it.

Do you agree?

I agree up to the water escaping the hose. Once that nozzle is open, the water then hits the atmosphere at force.

 

This is where scientists are clever at fucking with people's minds to have them believe something that just isn't true. I'd never call anyone stupid for believing it because most don't question it, or even know how stuff works anyway.

 

Take the same hose but under a quarter of the pressure. The fireman (Sam) , opens the nozzle and sees the water come out and hit the deck, basically like us having a piss.

It doesn't push him back or push on the hose much because it's hitting the atmosphere slowly and falling to the deck with gravity force. Turn up the pressure and it now defies gravity by that force and the water fights its way through the air, pushing the air out of the way but in doing so, it's compressing the air directly in front of the water jet which in turn is pushing back on it.

 

 

Think of it like a bike pump.

If you push down on a bike pump in the air, it's easy to do because you are pushing air into air. If you try and do it fast, you find that you compress the air far more than can be ejected from the small hole, meaning it creates resistance against your hand, acting like a shock absorber if you like.

 

If I was to put my finger over the hole and you pressed down on the pump, it would want to spring back up against you because your strength cannot compress the air any more.

 

If you were to do this in a vacuum, it wouldn't matter if I had my finger on the end or not because you could push that handle right down as it has no air to compress.

 

Equally in the vacuum, if you pressed down fast on that handle, it would go down very fast and create nothing because there is no pressure to create.

If you were to fill that same pump with air, then slam down the handle expelling the air into a vacuum, the vacuum would create no resistance to it, nor would it compress, because there's nothing to compress , all that would happen is, the vacuum would swallow up IMMEDIATELY and air inside the pump.

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If your man in space with the medicine ball had a an elephant ( or something much heavier then him) instead and he tried to throw it. Using as much force as he could muster. Would he move or would the elephant move?

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If your man in space with the medicine ball had a an elephant ( or something much heavier then him) instead and he tried to throw it. Using as much force as he could muster. Would he move or would the elephant move?

The Elephant would move simply by the spring of his arms.

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Now if the medicine ball or elephant was caught by a second person in space what would happen to ball/elephant and the other man?

 

Also how would a newtons cradle operate in a vacuum. When your raise and release the first ball what would happen. Would it hit the others and work the same as in air or would something else happen?

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Now if the medicine ball or elephant was caught by a second person in space what would happen to ball/elephant and the other man?

 

Also how would a newtons cradle operate in a vacuum. When your raise and release the first ball what would happen. Would it hit the others and work the same as in air or would something else happen?

In answer to your first question, the person who caught the ball/Elephant would be carried along with it.

 

Your second question ,' Newtons cradle' in the vacuum of space, assuming space is as we are told and assuming you are releasing one of the balls to crash into the rest assume it would hit them , pushing them all forward and all the wires would end up tangled to hell until they could tangle no more, stopping the force applied.

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