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Steve has a recommendation for you.....       I thought the outside story was good, can't wait for the inside one.            

One of the current Mrs PL’s favourites...shes often said I’d like them, and I almost certainly would, if it wasn’t for my bitter dislike of that fuckin cunt Henry Tudor  & everything he stood for.

Broken Greek by Pete Paphides...   Reading between the lines, there’s a fair few on here born at the the end of the 60s/early 70s....  I’d encourage all of those individuals to read this, it

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You should read Moby Dick like Brock. And some Edgar Allan Poe. Classic American literature.

 

On the road by Kerouac is a really classic American book. Probably my favourite ever.

 

I've just finished Chisel beach by Mcewan (his latest). Thought it was brilliant. If you want his best work read the innocent though imo.

 

Currently reading Lunar Park by Easton Ellis. Not quite finished and struggling to imagine how this will end satisfactorily, good reading anyway though.

Spot on there with Kerouac. Have you read 'Big Sur'? It's sort of a follow up to 'On The Road' only ten years or so later when he's famous and cynical as fuck (not to mention paranoid too). Quite grim but excellent nonetheless.

And a self destructive alcoholic. When interviewed by Carson, Kerouac was asked why he drank so much.

To which he replied, "I'm catholic and it is a mortal sin to commit suicide but there is nothing in the bible to stop me drinking myself to death."

On the other side of the beat poet tracks have you read Junky or Naked Lunch by William S Burroughs?

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You should read Moby Dick like Brock. And some Edgar Allan Poe. Classic American literature.

 

On the road by Kerouac is a really classic American book. Probably my favourite ever.

 

I've just finished Chisel beach by Mcewan (his latest). Thought it was brilliant. If you want his best work read the innocent though imo.

 

Currently reading Lunar Park by Easton Ellis. Not quite finished and struggling to imagine how this will end satisfactorily, good reading anyway though.

Spot on there with Kerouac. Have you read 'Big Sur'? It's sort of a follow up to 'On The Road' only ten years or so later when he's famous and cynical as fuck (not to mention paranoid too). Quite grim but excellent nonetheless.

And a self destructive alcoholic. When interviewed by Carson, Kerouac was asked why he drank so much.

To which he replied, "I'm catholic and it is a mortal sin to commit suicide but there is nothing in the bible to stop me drinking myself to death."

On the other side of the beat poet tracks have you read Junky or Naked Lunch by William S Burroughs?

I've got Naked Lunch sat on the bookshelf at home in my 'to read' bit. I've read 'Junkie' though. Tis a good read. Charles Bukowski's my favourite of that era though.

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You should read Moby Dick like Brock. And some Edgar Allan Poe. Classic American literature.

 

On the road by Kerouac is a really classic American book. Probably my favourite ever.

 

I've just finished Chisel beach by Mcewan (his latest). Thought it was brilliant. If you want his best work read the innocent though imo.

 

Currently reading Lunar Park by Easton Ellis. Not quite finished and struggling to imagine how this will end satisfactorily, good reading anyway though.

Spot on there with Kerouac. Have you read 'Big Sur'? It's sort of a follow up to 'On The Road' only ten years or so later when he's famous and cynical as fuck (not to mention paranoid too). Quite grim but excellent nonetheless.

And a self destructive alcoholic. When interviewed by Carson, Kerouac was asked why he drank so much.

To which he replied, "I'm catholic and it is a mortal sin to commit suicide but there is nothing in the bible to stop me drinking myself to death."

On the other side of the beat poet tracks have you read Junky or Naked Lunch by William S Burroughs?

I've got Naked Lunch sat on the bookshelf at home in my 'to read' bit. I've read 'Junkie' though. Tis a good read. Charles Bukowski's my favourite of that era though.

 

 

I find Burroughs heavy going.

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You should read Moby Dick like Brock. And some Edgar Allan Poe. Classic American literature.

 

On the road by Kerouac is a really classic American book. Probably my favourite ever.

 

I've just finished Chisel beach by Mcewan (his latest). Thought it was brilliant. If you want his best work read the innocent though imo.

 

Currently reading Lunar Park by Easton Ellis. Not quite finished and struggling to imagine how this will end satisfactorily, good reading anyway though.

Spot on there with Kerouac. Have you read 'Big Sur'? It's sort of a follow up to 'On The Road' only ten years or so later when he's famous and cynical as fuck (not to mention paranoid too). Quite grim but excellent nonetheless.

And a self destructive alcoholic. When interviewed by Carson, Kerouac was asked why he drank so much.

To which he replied, "I'm catholic and it is a mortal sin to commit suicide but there is nothing in the bible to stop me drinking myself to death."

On the other side of the beat poet tracks have you read Junky or Naked Lunch by William S Burroughs?

I've got Naked Lunch sat on the bookshelf at home in my 'to read' bit. I've read 'Junkie' though. Tis a good read. Charles Bukowski's my favourite of that era though.

 

 

I find Burroughs heavy going.

Personally Junkie (originally released as junky) was easy, naked lunch was very camp but Hunter S Thompson, now there is hard work.

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This country [/Alan Partridge]

I've never been to the library for years like. You should be able to get those in that series Penguin (iirc) did of classics for a quid. Moby Dick was definitely one of them. Amazon is good too although the delivery charge is a bit steep for books. That sort of stuff always pops up in 2nd hand book shops too.

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This country [/Alan Partridge]

I've never been to the library for years like. You should be able to get those in that series Penguin (iirc) did of classics for a quid. Moby Dick was definitely one of them. Amazon is good too although the delivery charge is a bit steep for books. That sort of stuff always pops up in 2nd hand book shops too.

If Brock really wants Moby Dick, I'll post my copy to him just to get the fucker off my bookshelf!

Melville does my head in with his inane style, which I know is harsh considering how important the work is in American literature.

I think I'd rather recommend the Scarlett Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne if you really need to subject yourself to that period of American literature.

I know it's a different era but I much prefer John Steinbeck's work for an insight into America's backwater undercurrent.

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This country [/Alan Partridge]

I've never been to the library for years like. You should be able to get those in that series Penguin (iirc) did of classics for a quid. Moby Dick was definitely one of them. Amazon is good too although the delivery charge is a bit steep for books. That sort of stuff always pops up in 2nd hand book shops too.

If Brock really wants Moby Dick, I'll post my copy to him just to get the fucker off my bookshelf!

Melville does my head in with his inane style, which I know is harsh considering how important the work is in American literature.

I think I'd rather recommend the Scarlett Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne if you really need to subject yourself to that period of American literature.

I know it's a different era but I much prefer John Steinbeck's work for an insight into America's backwater undercurrent.

Aye well, that's probably because Moby Dick is about a nutter chasing an albino sperm whale around the Pacific :pray: Steinbeck is class though, I agree. I love Moby Dick though. One of my all-time favourites.

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I'm a few days into The Damned United and it's a fucking brilliant read. I know there has probably been some poetic licensce on Peace's part and it's probably a bit over the top but still, it's a great biographical account of his time at Leeds.

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I'm a few days into The Damned United and it's a fucking brilliant read. I know there has probably been some poetic licensce on Peace's part and it's probably a bit over the top but still, it's a great biographical account of his time at Leeds.

 

 

Isn't it entirely fictional? Outside of the fact that he was at Leeds.

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I'm a few days into The Damned United and it's a fucking brilliant read. I know there has probably been some poetic licensce on Peace's part and it's probably a bit over the top but still, it's a great biographical account of his time at Leeds.

 

 

Isn't it entirely fictional? Outside of the fact that he was at Leeds.

 

I've heard some parts are and other parts are as close to the truth as Peace could get them without it becoming fact *winking yella fella*

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