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I think their philosopy makes sense if you bear in mind their aim is to spend as little on players as possible and make as much money as they can for the minimum outlay.

 

The cups and europa dont earn enough by way of revenue unless you get to the final stages and you risk your players getting injured along the way. You cant afford injury because you've invested less than the bare minimum to get through the season, winning just enough games to stay clear of relegation. Which is the objective cos its where the TV money and audience for mikes SD advertising are.

 

So theres no point competing for cups when youre not prepared to invest the money in a deep enough squad to carry you through the extra games. Thats only for clubs owned by sovereign states apparently. Or clubs that care about their fans hopes and dreams.

 

We're basically acting like a cash strapped small town club, when plainly we have the resources to buy the players needed. Its a deliberate business decision not a footballing one.....but then we're not a football club, we're just one of mikes businesses. Any sort of success isn't worth the cost....when they say it has to wipe its nose, I think they mean make lots of money for mike

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I think their philosopy makes sense if you bear in mind their aim is to spend as little on players as possible and make as much money as they can for the minimum outlay.

 

The cups and europa dont earn enough by way of revenue unless you get to the final stages and you risk your players getting injured along the way. You cant afford injury because you've invested less than the bare minimum to get through the season, winning just enough games to stay clear of relegation. Which is the objective cos its where the TV money and audience for mikes SD advertising are.

 

So theres no point competing for cups when youre not prepared to invest the money in a deep enough squad to carry you through the extra games. Thats only for clubs owned by sovereign states apparently. Or clubs that care about their fans hopes and dreams.

 

We're basically acting like a cash strapped small town club, when plainly we have the resources to buy the players needed. Its a deliberate business decision not a footballing one.....but then we're not a football club, we're just one of mikes businesses. Any sort of success isn't worth the cost....when they say it has to wipe its nose, I think they mean make lots of money for mike

 

I agree with all of that.

 

We're currently sitting in limbo. I think that Ashley would get rid of us in a shot if he were offered the money he has put into us. He isn't doing it for the advertising, that's just a useful bi-product of his ownership. He certainly isn't doing it for the love of football or for the club. He views the club as an asset that he wants to remain stable until someone will come along and give him at least £250m for it. He hasn't put it up for sale as that will disadvantage his bargaining position and is happy enough for it to continue to run as long as it doesn't cost him any further money.

 

So unfortunately, for the time being, we're stuck with a club that leaves us feeling numb, with no ambition other than to survive.

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I still can't believe the club has gone on record with this. The only news lines the national press have picked from the minutes as far as I can see is Pardew staying in his job and no guarantee of spending unless it's the 'right player at the right price' after two windows without a permanent signing,

 

Nothing about not trying in the cups at all.

We don't live in a country where the media report on the game nationally, no, if this comment about the cups came out of White Hart Lane, The Etihad, Stamford Bridge, The Emirates or heaven forbid, Old Trafford and Anfield you'd never hear the end of it. Very strange in a way as it's an easy story to cover with no digging around required on their part. The media needs to up it's game too.

Edited by Howmanheyman
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one of the national reporters based in the region like caulkin or edwards will probably pick it up.

 

i'd like to a back page splash from one of the senior sports correspondents like winter, or a big feature by david bond at the beeb. it's a huge story and raises all kinds of ethical questions.

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I think the stakes are way beyond football and the response should be escalated in the extreme. These people should not be able to sleep at night.

 

Which fan though, could sleep at night themselves whilst still putting money into that club? That club, for it is certainly no longer ours. There is no precedent to the way I feel after reading what the club has said about the cups. There is no point in supporting this club anymore. Seriously, there isn't. The cups in the contemporary moment exist for clubs who aren't stinking rich to really write their names into history, to take a chance and pull off what every player and supporter have dreamed about since they were kids - to lift a major trophy, to see their club win something notable. What we have at Newcastle United is just emptiness, a lobotomised football club running on auto-pilot. I do not think that Newcastle are the only club whose chairman would be thinking this way, but to say it, so bluntly, so brutally to the fans who pay week in, week out, that they do not even have the cups to hope for, that they have taken away the cups as perhaps the only true '11 vs 11 on the day, anything might happen', is the final stray for me like. Never, never again will I put a penny into this club until every single one of the cunts has fucked off. Never. I feel like I've been duped once again. No one gives a flying fuck about us as supporters, and they never will. We have to take care of ourselves.

 

Fuck every single one of them who has had a hand in the steady debilitation of Newcastle United over the past few years, and has succeeded in turning the club into something I do not recognise anymore.

Edited by ADP
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There has to be a concerted effort to get these out of the club we must be United. Match goers, armchair fans, forums, the media & the City Council. They've drawn the battle lines by issuing those minutes & it's definitely a case of us & them. Look at that picture Mr Fist put up the first thing that catches the eye is the Sports Direct signage then sort of squeezed in the middle is the Newcastle United name.St James Park has become a 52,000 seater catalogue advertising Sports Direct not a football ground. It's like the football side is a pain in the arse he has to put up with for the free advertising. Having said that he made £1.45 billion in the last 12 months I'm sure it's a pain in the arse he can live with.

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Is it too strong to say yesterday a board member openly admitted that they will throw games next season?

 

Clubs have been doing it in practice for well over a decade now but no one has actually come out and put it in such stark terms. If winning the league cup was worth 5million I think the marketing department of Sports Direct (the football club formerly known as Newcastle United) would take it more seriously.

Edited by PaddockLad
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I do wonder about why people would turn out on cold wednesday night to watch our B team get shafted by a League 1 side.

 

I don't think we're alone in playing our B team in cup matches btw. It's just that ours is dog shit due to the perennial underfunding of the squad.

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I can't really understand why anyone would get a cup ticket next season but I bet that there's plenty who will. This is what makes me certain that there will never be any mass bouycott of games. They've put it in writing that they aren't going to try in the cups at all yet there will still be thousands of people go to the games. Those who go aren't really fans, they could as easily be going to the cinema, theatre or whatever. They are just out for a nights entertainment (although how anyone could consider the shite that we've been serving up for the last few years entertainment is beyond me).

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Next season is my last. It's a chore watching us at the best of times, but it's going to be painful turning up every Saturday to support a shithouse Newcastle side managed by that slimy dodgepot knowing that the height of our ambition is midtable. Fuck that.

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So I guess that explains the dog shit performances we've seen in the cups under Pardew, the next statement could address how we now get turned over by the mackems everytime, or is that simply just to try and further kick any passion out of the fan base.

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dullest billionaire ever.

 

what a fucking cock end.

Aye, you'd think he'd want some enjoyment out of an asset like a football club, like what other Billionaires do. He simply just sees it as yet another vehicle to make more money, but he's at the point of wealth where it's just money to move up the rich list and not about increasing his standard of living. I'm not saying go round spunking 200m a year like others do, but he may as well hoy in 20-30m a year and watch some decent football, it'll not even dent his wealth.

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153233108_newcastle_694638d1.jpg

 

There is no straining for glory at Newcastle

George Caulkin

May 15 2014 14:05PM

 

 

Listen closely on match day at St James’ Park and you can hear it. Beneath the clamour for Alan Pardew’s removal, the chanting against Mike Ashley’s tainted stewardship, you can hear it. Beneath the swells of noise which still pummel Newcastle United’s stadium, when you can close your eyes and conjure those warm, aching memories of Shearer and Sir Bobby, Keegan and beyond, you can hear it. Tick, tick, tick. The sound of a football club ticking over.

 

Look across the country and you will see teams in peril, indebted to the eyeballs, haemorrhaging money. You will find anguish and despair, the newly-relegated wrestling with reduced status and job-losses. Throughout the divisions, you will stumble upon fractured dreams and sharp disappointment, concerns that careerist managers or stellar players will move on. But you will not see anywhere less life-affirming than Newcastle.

 

Read through the minutes of the club’s latest Fans Forum and experience a moment of cold, grey clarity; Ashley and Lee Charnley, his managing director, are not custodians of a proud sporting institution, they are caretakers. There is no straining for glory, pushing for excellence, or speculating to accumulate, they are keeping the place tidy and double-checking that the lights still work. Tick, tick, ticking over.

 

There was no fresh discovery – the heavily-trailed confirmation that Pardew “will remain the club’s manager,” barely counts – and yet with each repetition of these bland and misery words, bereft of any feeling or colour, we understand more about Newcastle’s standing. My favourite sentence was probably the “commitment to an open and consistent communications process.” Co-writer: David Brent.

 

The humourless, corporate language is not a coincidence; it has been one of the few consistencies of the Ashley era, where programme notes, statements and press releases are passed from desk to desk and stripped of love, until they read like the most turgid of annual reports. Don’t let them Geordies get too keen, whatever you do. Don’t get their hopes up. Play down, minimise, obfuscate, offend.

 

In the case of cup competitions, their attitude is now entrenched. “The board reiterated that the Premier League will remain the club’s priority,” they said and, in itself, there is nothing unremarkable here. Whoever you are, the league is always the priority, the bread and butter, the paying of bills, the bedrock of any season and more so, perhaps, when the consequences of relegation can be counted in the tens of millions.

 

It is impossible to actively prioritise a tournament which, by its very nature, is unpredictable; all it takes is one blast from the referee’s whistle, an own-goal, a bad decision, a wondrous intervention from an opponent to make planning worthless. By the same token, you can be set up to have a go, you can pick your best team, motivate your players, instil in the club the desire and ambition to win something, the emotional importance of ending that journey.

 

Yohan Cabaye (“injured” although fit enough to play the matches immediately before and afterwards) and Loic Remy did not start against Cardiff City in the FA Cup third round on January 4 and Newcastle duly lost. Those who say the XI picked by Pardew was strong enough have a point, but the atmosphere was flat and beaten from the beginning and did not waver. They have not progressed beyond the fourth round of either domestic cup under Ashley.

 

The Fans Forum again. “The board outlined research into Premier League clubs in relation to domestic cup competitions in the last five years, with Swansea City the only club outside the traditional top six to win a domestic cup and not be relegated in the same season (Birmingham and Wigan Athletic were both relegated).” Research over the last five years is a contradiction in terms. It is a five-minute click-fest on Wikipedia.

 

How about this season, when Sunderland’s fortunes were resuscitated and then inspired by their run in the Capital One Cup? How about Hull City, who have definitely not been relegated and are in Saturday’s FA Cup final? What about Portsmouth (not, admittedly, the best model of financial probity), who won it six years ago and finished eighth? Since 2000, Leicester City, Blackburn Rovers and Middlesbrough have all lifted a trophy and stayed up, outside the top-six.

 

This is not prioritising, this is close to saying that cups are unwelcome (which, in retrospect, is pretty much how Newcastle’s season in the Europa League has been portrayed). Here is the next passage: “Independent research into the cost of relegation over the past ten years showed there is a 50 per cent chance of not gaining promotion back to the top flight and a 30 per cent chance of being relegated to League One or further. In addition, if clubs do return to the Premier League, it takes four years on average.”

 

What if Newcastle could finish higher in the table than their most recent 10th? “At this moment in time, the club’s priority is the Premier League.” The choice being offered is stark: stay in the Premier League or go for a cup and be relegated. It is also patronising nonsense.

 

Newcastle are averse to opportunity. When they finished fifth in 2012 and had momentum behind them, their only senior signing was Vurnon Anita, whose midfield position was not a priority. By the time January came along and a small squad was stretched and struggling, they were obliged to splurge. Then came Joe Kinnear and a wasteland spell of Director of Football, which brought two transfer windows without a permanent addition.

 

They were sixth on Boxing Day, with a chance to kick on. Instead, Cabaye was sold – for less than Ashley wanted – and promise dissipated into dreadful form and growing animosity. Contrary to the statement which accompanied Charnley’s recent promotion, when he said Newcastle’s intention is to sign “one or two players per year to strengthen the squad,” they will be far more active this summer, but this is less a demonstration of ambition as simple necessity.

 

Without Cabaye, Newcastle are barren creatively, particularly with Pardew unwilling to accommodate Hatem Ben Arfa. Without Loic Remy, whose loan from Queens Park Rangers is now complete, they have no regular source of goals, and without Shola Ameobi and Luuk de Jong they have no back-up, no matter how pale. Replacing them will be costly, although with the money they have saved and the riches banked from television revenue, they can afford it.

 

Newcastle have become self-sufficient, but no boundaries are being pushed. At the Fans Forum, it was said that “the owner is not actively trying to sell the football club,” and while this is true – no bank or broker has been engaged – there is a sensation of limbo, stability as an end in itself rather than a side-effect of sound and structured leadership, tick, tick, ticking over, waiting for the right offer, loveless and lacking soul. They are a football club where football is no longer a “priority”.

 

Spot on as always :nufc:

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