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There are a number of mechanisms used to handle hydrogen on a sub reactor system, but you are getting into the technical details now which are classified so I can't say anything on that issue.

Oh ok, classified.

So we can know how uranium fissions and all the rest of it but they won;t allow people to explain how a hydrogen build up venting system works.

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So far you have only asked generic questions on the sub reactor which is all not protectively marked. Its the details that are classified e.g. temperatures, pressures, designs, materials, With the hydrogen you are getting into details, so the info is protected.

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So far you have only asked generic questions on the sub reactor which is all not protectively marked. Its the details that are classified e.g. temperatures, pressures, designs, materials, With the hydrogen you are getting into details, so the info is protected.

Ok it's protected.

 

They can tell us exactly how a nuclear bomb works from start to finish but the venting of hydrogen is a protected secret.

It's a weird business this nuclear power game isn't it.

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Ok it's protected.

 

They can tell us exactly how a nuclear bomb works from start to finish but the venting of hydrogen is a protected secret.

It's a weird business this nuclear power game isn't it.

:lol:

 

If you were a dog, I'd put you down.

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Can't be arsed to start a new thread, and probably no-one would be interested, but there was an excellent documentary on the Voyager space crafts tonight on BBC 4. Well worth watching on iPlayer if these missions captured your imagination as a kid or if you're interested in interplanetary space travel in general. Conspiracy nuts needn't bother themselves naturally. It'll be another 150 years before another planetary grand tour like this will be possible. There's another documentary on stellar evolution on at the same time and place tomorrow for anyone with exceptional nerdy needs. :dunno:

Thought this was a stunning documentary like. I actually wondered if you'd caught it when I was watching it (DWEEB!!! that I am). It's an absolutely fascinating mission. I thought it really showed what a charismatic visionary Carl Sagan was as well.

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Kubrick could shoot 2001 in 68 but couldn't fake the moon landing shots in 69? What guff.

 

:lol: , cos 2001 looked just like the Apollo footage.

 

Parky, did you actually watch the video? Anyway, I honestly don't get why you think it was faked considering your theories on human space colonisation. I mean, why bother?

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Why did wolfy leave?

He was King Cnut and reality was the crashing tide... except Cnut knew his limitations and was demonstrating the impotence of man in the face of irrefutable evidence of the awesome power of nature and Wolfy didn't believe in evidence, so I suppose he's nothing like King Cnut at all...

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Nasa has denied a claim made in a scientific study that its Voyager 1 spacecraft had left the solar system, describing the report as "premature".

 

Scientists are eagerly awaiting signs that the craft, which was launched in 1977 on a mission to study planets, has become the first man-made object to leave the boundaries of our solar system.

 

A scientific paper that purported to describe this departure appeared on the American Geophysical Union's website.

 

It said Voyager 1 "appears to have travelled beyond the influence of the Sun and exited the heliosphere," or the magnetic bubble of charged particles that surround the solar system.

 

Researcher Bill Webber, one of the article's authors, acknowledged that the actual location of the spacecraft - whether in interstellar space or just an unknown region beyond the solar system - remained a matter of debate.

 

"It's outside the normal heliosphere, I would say that," said Mr Webber, professor emeritus of astronomy at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, according to the AGU's web site.

 

"We're in a new region. And everything we're measuring is different and exciting."

 

However, shortly after the study appeared, Nasa spokesman Dwayne Brown said the report was "premature and incorrect".

 

The Voyager science team reported in December 2012 the craft was in a new region called the "magnetic highway," but changes in the magnetic field to show a departure from the solar system have not yet been observed, Nasa said.

 

"The Voyager team is aware of reports today that Nasa's Voyager 1 has left the solar system," said Edward Stone, Voyager project scientist based at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California.

 

"It is the consensus of the Voyager science team that Voyager 1 has not yet left the solar system or reached interstellar space," he said.

 

"A change in the direction of the magnetic field is the last critical indicator of reaching interstellar space and that change of direction has not yet been observed."

 

Voyager 1 and its companion Voyager 2 set off in 1977 on a mission to study planets. They have both kept going, and both are on track to leave the solar system, Nasa has said.

 

For months, experts have been closely watching for hints that Voyager 1 has left the solar system and most have estimated that this will happen in the next year or two.

 

Nasa has described Voyager 1 - now 11 billion miles away from the Sun - and its companion Voyager 2 as "the two most distant active representatives of humanity and its desire to explore".

 

The Voyager craft are both carrying gold-plated phonograph records and cartridges on which to play them.

 

They contain 115 images of Earth life, sounds made by whales, thunder and surf, spoken greetings in various languages and printed messages from former US president Jimmy Carter and former UN chief Kurt Waldheim.

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Nasa has denied a claim made in a scientific study that its Voyager 1 spacecraft had left the solar system, describing the report as "premature".

 

Scientists are eagerly awaiting signs that the craft, which was launched in 1977 on a mission to study planets, has become the first man-made object to leave the boundaries of our solar system.

 

A scientific paper that purported to describe this departure appeared on the American Geophysical Union's website.

 

It said Voyager 1 "appears to have travelled beyond the influence of the Sun and exited the heliosphere," or the magnetic bubble of charged particles that surround the solar system.

 

Researcher Bill Webber, one of the article's authors, acknowledged that the actual location of the spacecraft - whether in interstellar space or just an unknown region beyond the solar system - remained a matter of debate.

 

"It's outside the normal heliosphere, I would say that," said Mr Webber, professor emeritus of astronomy at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, according to the AGU's web site.

 

"We're in a new region. And everything we're measuring is different and exciting."

 

However, shortly after the study appeared, Nasa spokesman Dwayne Brown said the report was "premature and incorrect".

 

The Voyager science team reported in December 2012 the craft was in a new region called the "magnetic highway," but changes in the magnetic field to show a departure from the solar system have not yet been observed, Nasa said.

 

"The Voyager team is aware of reports today that Nasa's Voyager 1 has left the solar system," said Edward Stone, Voyager project scientist based at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California.

 

"It is the consensus of the Voyager science team that Voyager 1 has not yet left the solar system or reached interstellar space," he said.

 

"A change in the direction of the magnetic field is the last critical indicator of reaching interstellar space and that change of direction has not yet been observed."

 

Voyager 1 and its companion Voyager 2 set off in 1977 on a mission to study planets. They have both kept going, and both are on track to leave the solar system, Nasa has said.

 

For months, experts have been closely watching for hints that Voyager 1 has left the solar system and most have estimated that this will happen in the next year or two.

 

Nasa has described Voyager 1 - now 11 billion miles away from the Sun - and its companion Voyager 2 as "the two most distant active representatives of humanity and its desire to explore".

 

The Voyager craft are both carrying gold-plated phonograph records and cartridges on which to play them.

 

They contain 115 images of Earth life, sounds made by whales, thunder and surf, spoken greetings in various languages and printed messages from former US president Jimmy Carter and former UN chief Kurt Waldheim.

 

Shame we hadn't twigged Waldheim was a Nazi by then.

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